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2012

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  • Last week Senators Bingaman and Udall wrote a letter urging the President to create two new National Monuments in New Mexico in Taos and Dona Ana County. This was a huge positive development for our campaigns in these areas because it signals a serious advancement in the possibility that we could be looking at one or both these areas being designated National Monuments in the next few months. New Mexico is now front and center in the national monument hunt. 

    Read letter now.

  • Last week Senators Bingaman and Udall wrote a letter urging the President to create two new National Monuments in New Mexico in Taos and Dona Ana County. This was a huge positive development for our campaigns in these areas because it signals a serious advancement in the possibility that we could be looking at one or both these areas being designated National Monuments in the next few months. New Mexico is now front and center in the national monument hunt. 

    Read letter now.

  • Last week Senators Bingaman and Udall wrote a letter urging the President to create two new National Monuments in New Mexico in Taos and Dona Ana County. This was a huge positive development for our campaigns in these areas because it signals a serious advancement in the possibility that we could be looking at one or both these areas being designated National Monuments in the next few months. New Mexico is now front and center in the national monument hunt. 

    Read letter now.

  • The Taos News

    The New Mexico Green Chamber of Commerce applauds the results of the BBC Research and Consulting study that shows designating the Río Grande del Norte area northwest of Taos as a national monument would increase revenue and jobs in the area — respectively by $15 million and 279 new jobs.

    We also thank Sens. Jeff Bingaman and Tom Udall, as well as Reps. Ben Ray Luján and Martin Heinrich, for pursuing national monument designation for Río Grande del Norte. The community’s excitement about this opportunity is palpable and it would provide an important boost for our local economy.

    National Monument status for the Río Grande del Norte is a smart way to attract tourist dollars and assure the preservation of this cultural and historic area for generations to come.

    Many Green Chamber business members in Taos depend on the Río Grande and the view of the Gorge and the Taos Plateau for their livelihoods. They inherently know the value of preserving the land and water.

    According to National Park Service data, visitor spending at the 10 areas in New Mexico that were designated as national monuments by past presidents supports nearly 1,100 local jobs and contributes $54 million to new Mexico’s economy. We hope President Obama takes action before the end of the year to help Northern New Mexico’s economy and increase both of those figures significantly.

  • The Taos News

    The New Mexico Green Chamber of Commerce applauds the results of the BBC Research and Consulting study that shows designating the Río Grande del Norte area northwest of Taos as a national monument would increase revenue and jobs in the area — respectively by $15 million and 279 new jobs.

    We also thank Sens. Jeff Bingaman and Tom Udall, as well as Reps. Ben Ray Luján and Martin Heinrich, for pursuing national monument designation for Río Grande del Norte. The community’s excitement about this opportunity is palpable and it would provide an important boost for our local economy.

    National Monument status for the Río Grande del Norte is a smart way to attract tourist dollars and assure the preservation of this cultural and historic area for generations to come.

    Many Green Chamber business members in Taos depend on the Río Grande and the view of the Gorge and the Taos Plateau for their livelihoods. They inherently know the value of preserving the land and water.

    According to National Park Service data, visitor spending at the 10 areas in New Mexico that were designated as national monuments by past presidents supports nearly 1,100 local jobs and contributes $54 million to new Mexico’s economy. We hope President Obama takes action before the end of the year to help Northern New Mexico’s economy and increase both of those figures significantly.

  • By Rene Romo / Journal South Reporter on Wed, Sep 12, 2012 

    LUNA — One branch of the federal government, the Agriculture Department’s Wildlife Services, set traps in the northern edge of the Gila National Forest last week in a frustrating, monthlong effort to capture the elusive alpha female of the Fox Mountain wolf pack, blamed for a string of recent livestock kills.

    Meanwhile, officials in another agency, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, fretted over the difficult decision to impound the wolf, one of an official count of 58 in New Mexico and Arizona.
    The tug of war over what to do with the Fox Mountain wolf has illustrated again the deep divide that has plagued the recovery of the endangered Mexican gray wolf.

    On one hand, conservationists want a native predator that was nearly hunted to extinction restored to the landscape under the Endangered Species Act; on the other, critics, dominated by the livestock industry, argue the lobos are a menace that take a bite out of their pocketbooks by killing cows and other livestock.

    Now, the Fish and Wildlife Service appears poised to endorse a new approach, dubbed coexistence, aimed at creating more tolerance for lobos in the ranching community.

    Details won’t be released until next month at the earliest. However, according to a broad outline provided by people familiar with the plan, it would do this: Rather than compensate ranchers for confirmed wolf kills of livestock, the program would pay ranchers and those who own property in wolf country, based on a formula that would take into account a number of factors, such as the proximity of a wolf pack, the number of livestock exposed to the threat of wolves, a ranchers’ willingness to take steps to reduce wolf-livestock conflicts and the growth of the wild wolf population.

    The idea of shifting to a new way of compensating ranchers in wolf country is, in part, a recognition that ranchers sustain losses for which they are not compensated, for instance, cattle that disappear or stressed cattle, said Craig Miller, Southwestern representative of Defenders of Wildlife and a member of the Mexican Wolf Interdiction Fund Stakeholders Council. The Council makes recommendations on how much to pay ranchers for livestock killed by wolves, with payments from a privately managed fund financed by Defenders and the federal government.

    A baseline payment, of a still undetermined amount, would recognize that “there are costs of living in the presence of wolves,” Miller said. “The program is trying to get away from postmortem compensation. That begins with dead livestock and ends with dead wolves.”

    As Miller envisions it, Arizona-based Defenders of Wildlife would continue, as it does now, to provide funds to ranchers for measures aimed at avoiding wolf-livestock conflicts, such as hiring range riders to guard herds, moving cattle to pastures away from wolf dens, or the purchase of hay. According to Miller, ranchers could be paid to take steps to reduce conflicts with wolves, and then be rewarded when those measures result in the growth of the wolf population.

    “It’s trying to get cooperation on both sides,” said Sherry Barrett, wolf recovery program coordinator for the Fish and Wildlife Service. “There’s a lot of emotion around wolves, both pro and con. … So we are trying to find something that reduces some of this conflict.”

    A key part of the plan — securing a big enough pot of money to pay ranchers an amount that would allay concerns about cattle losses — has yet to be accomplished. Money in the existing Interdiction Fund managed by a Washington, D.C.-based nonprofit group can only be used to pay ranchers for livestock losses.

    To succeed, the plan would have to be embraced by the livestock industry, and several ranchers in Arizona and New Mexico said this week that they knew little or nothing about it. Laura Schneberger, president of the Gila Livestock Growers Association, said she doubted such a program would work for small ranchers who are less able to endure wolf depredations.

    In the case of the Fox Mountain packs’ cattle depredations, ranchers called for wolf removals, while hundreds of wolf supporters pushed back against the initial kill order issued Aug. 8. Many wolf advocates celebrated when the kill order was rescinded two days later, after permanent housing for the wolf was secured in an Arizona sanctuary, while others maintained that the wolf should be allowed to remain free.

    Before a few wolves were reintroduced to the wild in 1998, federal officials projected there would be about 100 wolves in the forests of southwestern New Mexico and southeastern Arizona by the end of 2006. As of January, the official population count was 58.

    Illegal poaching and the removal of wolves in earlier years for cattle depredations have been major factors in keeping down the number of wild-roaming lobos.

    The desire to respond to rancher concerns was, in no small measure, what motivated Fish and Wildlife to exercise the discretion it has to manage, or remove, a “problem” wolf that repeatedly preys on livestock, Barrett acknowledged.

    Whether a new approach to compensating ranchers for living with wolves is enough to bridge old divides is far from certain. Just in the past week, an online petition was launched that calls for blocking new releases of wolves and, eventually, the removal of wolves from the Southwest.

    “I suspect we’ll get backlash from all sides,” Barrett said. “I’ve never seen a plan that didn’t get backlash, but what we are doing is trying to find a middle ground.”
    Meanwhile, one freedom-loving lobo continues trying to steer clear of traps.

    UpFront is a daily front-page news and opinion column. Comment directly to Rene Romo in Las Cruces at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or 575-526-4462. Go to ABQjournal.com/letters/new to submit a letter to the editor.

  • By Rene Romo / Journal South Reporter on Wed, Sep 12, 2012 

    LUNA — One branch of the federal government, the Agriculture Department’s Wildlife Services, set traps in the northern edge of the Gila National Forest last week in a frustrating, monthlong effort to capture the elusive alpha female of the Fox Mountain wolf pack, blamed for a string of recent livestock kills.

    Meanwhile, officials in another agency, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, fretted over the difficult decision to impound the wolf, one of an official count of 58 in New Mexico and Arizona.
    The tug of war over what to do with the Fox Mountain wolf has illustrated again the deep divide that has plagued the recovery of the endangered Mexican gray wolf.

    On one hand, conservationists want a native predator that was nearly hunted to extinction restored to the landscape under the Endangered Species Act; on the other, critics, dominated by the livestock industry, argue the lobos are a menace that take a bite out of their pocketbooks by killing cows and other livestock.

    Now, the Fish and Wildlife Service appears poised to endorse a new approach, dubbed coexistence, aimed at creating more tolerance for lobos in the ranching community.

    Details won’t be released until next month at the earliest. However, according to a broad outline provided by people familiar with the plan, it would do this: Rather than compensate ranchers for confirmed wolf kills of livestock, the program would pay ranchers and those who own property in wolf country, based on a formula that would take into account a number of factors, such as the proximity of a wolf pack, the number of livestock exposed to the threat of wolves, a ranchers’ willingness to take steps to reduce wolf-livestock conflicts and the growth of the wild wolf population.

    The idea of shifting to a new way of compensating ranchers in wolf country is, in part, a recognition that ranchers sustain losses for which they are not compensated, for instance, cattle that disappear or stressed cattle, said Craig Miller, Southwestern representative of Defenders of Wildlife and a member of the Mexican Wolf Interdiction Fund Stakeholders Council. The Council makes recommendations on how much to pay ranchers for livestock killed by wolves, with payments from a privately managed fund financed by Defenders and the federal government.

    A baseline payment, of a still undetermined amount, would recognize that “there are costs of living in the presence of wolves,” Miller said. “The program is trying to get away from postmortem compensation. That begins with dead livestock and ends with dead wolves.”

    As Miller envisions it, Arizona-based Defenders of Wildlife would continue, as it does now, to provide funds to ranchers for measures aimed at avoiding wolf-livestock conflicts, such as hiring range riders to guard herds, moving cattle to pastures away from wolf dens, or the purchase of hay. According to Miller, ranchers could be paid to take steps to reduce conflicts with wolves, and then be rewarded when those measures result in the growth of the wolf population.

    “It’s trying to get cooperation on both sides,” said Sherry Barrett, wolf recovery program coordinator for the Fish and Wildlife Service. “There’s a lot of emotion around wolves, both pro and con. … So we are trying to find something that reduces some of this conflict.”

    A key part of the plan — securing a big enough pot of money to pay ranchers an amount that would allay concerns about cattle losses — has yet to be accomplished. Money in the existing Interdiction Fund managed by a Washington, D.C.-based nonprofit group can only be used to pay ranchers for livestock losses.

    To succeed, the plan would have to be embraced by the livestock industry, and several ranchers in Arizona and New Mexico said this week that they knew little or nothing about it. Laura Schneberger, president of the Gila Livestock Growers Association, said she doubted such a program would work for small ranchers who are less able to endure wolf depredations.

    In the case of the Fox Mountain packs’ cattle depredations, ranchers called for wolf removals, while hundreds of wolf supporters pushed back against the initial kill order issued Aug. 8. Many wolf advocates celebrated when the kill order was rescinded two days later, after permanent housing for the wolf was secured in an Arizona sanctuary, while others maintained that the wolf should be allowed to remain free.

    Before a few wolves were reintroduced to the wild in 1998, federal officials projected there would be about 100 wolves in the forests of southwestern New Mexico and southeastern Arizona by the end of 2006. As of January, the official population count was 58.

    Illegal poaching and the removal of wolves in earlier years for cattle depredations have been major factors in keeping down the number of wild-roaming lobos.

    The desire to respond to rancher concerns was, in no small measure, what motivated Fish and Wildlife to exercise the discretion it has to manage, or remove, a “problem” wolf that repeatedly preys on livestock, Barrett acknowledged.

    Whether a new approach to compensating ranchers for living with wolves is enough to bridge old divides is far from certain. Just in the past week, an online petition was launched that calls for blocking new releases of wolves and, eventually, the removal of wolves from the Southwest.

    “I suspect we’ll get backlash from all sides,” Barrett said. “I’ve never seen a plan that didn’t get backlash, but what we are doing is trying to find a middle ground.”
    Meanwhile, one freedom-loving lobo continues trying to steer clear of traps.

    UpFront is a daily front-page news and opinion column. Comment directly to Rene Romo in Las Cruces at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or 575-526-4462. Go to ABQjournal.com/letters/new to submit a letter to the editor.

  • Hispanic leaders call on elected officials to protect Organ Mountains-Desert Peaks region. This video clip is from the poet Denise Chavez’s poem.

    Local and statewide Hispanic leaders including a former Governor, Attorney General, and Land Commissioner joined hundreds of local citizens in calling on elected officials to protect Southern New Mexico icons including the Organ Mountains during a press conference January 18, 2012, at the base of Tortugas Mountain (“A” Mountain). The group — Nuestra Tierra, Our Land – Our Future is focused on the deep connections and history many Hispanic residents share with natural gems in Doña Ana County.

    In conjunction with the press conference, the group sent letters to President Obama and members of the New Mexico congressional delegation urging immediate protection of the Organ Mountains-Desert Peak region. You can view the letter here: http://donaanawild.org/nuestratierra.php

    The Organ Mountains — Desert Peaks region includes the Organ, Robledo, Sierra de las Uvas, and Potrillo Mountains and important areas adjacent to them. In addition to vast ecological values, these areas also include well known historical events and figures including Billy the Kid, Geronimo, Butterfield Stagecoach Trail, Gadsden Purchase international boundary, and thousands of archeological sites from earlier Native American cultures.

  • Hispanic leaders call on elected officials to protect Organ Mountains-Desert Peaks region. This video clip is from the poet Denise Chavez’s poem.

    Local and statewide Hispanic leaders including a former Governor, Attorney General, and Land Commissioner joined hundreds of local citizens in calling on elected officials to protect Southern New Mexico icons including the Organ Mountains during a press conference January 18, 2012, at the base of Tortugas Mountain (“A” Mountain). The group — Nuestra Tierra, Our Land – Our Future is focused on the deep connections and history many Hispanic residents share with natural gems in Doña Ana County.

    In conjunction with the press conference, the group sent letters to President Obama and members of the New Mexico congressional delegation urging immediate protection of the Organ Mountains-Desert Peak region. You can view the letter here: http://donaanawild.org/nuestratierra.php

    The Organ Mountains — Desert Peaks region includes the Organ, Robledo, Sierra de las Uvas, and Potrillo Mountains and important areas adjacent to them. In addition to vast ecological values, these areas also include well known historical events and figures including Billy the Kid, Geronimo, Butterfield Stagecoach Trail, Gadsden Purchase international boundary, and thousands of archeological sites from earlier Native American cultures.

  • By Steve Ramirez for the Las Cruces Sun-News

    04/09/2012

    MESILLA — Nathan Small and Jeff Steinborn, supporters of efforts to have the Organ Mountains-Desert Peaks designated as a national monument, preached to the choir Monday.

    In the end, the “choir” sang back, as the Mesilla board of trustees unanimously adopted a resolution that now includes the town as supporters of the initiative. Mesilla becomes the first municipality in southern New Mexico to officially endorse the efforts, although Las Cruces and Doña Ana County are soon expected to follow.

    “You could just as easily call this the Mesilla National Monument,” Small said. “Mesilla has long been a champion of preservation initiatives.”

    Small told trustees that efforts to get the monument designation are focused on history, culture and education. But while the designation would protect natural resources, it would also enhance southern New Mexico’s economy.

    “The Organ Mountains-Desert Peaks has been centered not only to our region but our nation as well,” Small said.

    He added the monument would have strong ties to Mesilla. Small pointed out that the Butterfield Stagecoach Trail traveled directly through Mesilla, and the town’s most infamous detainee, legendary outlaw Billy the Kid, also hid out at “Outlaw Rock,” which also would be included within the proposed monument.

    “Billy the Kid left inscriptions not only here in Mesilla, but at Outlaw Rock as well,” Small said.

    Steinborn said it was fitting that Mesilla became the first community in southern New Mexico to formally support efforts for the national designation.”Mesilla has a lot of history tied to the monument,” Steinborn said. “They’ve proven they’re already ahead of the game when it comes to preserving history.”

    Mayor Nora Barraza said it was important that Mesilla get behind the proposal.

    “Once this is destroyed it can never come back,” said Barraza, of what could happen if the national monument designation doesn’t occur. “As our communities grow on all sides this area will be destroyed.

    “Plus, this gives us the opportunities to share these treasured natural resources with our grandchildren and other generations to come. …We’re honored to be a part of this.”

    Trustee Jesus Caro Jr. agreed.

    “I fully support all the efforts,” Caro said. “It’s in the best interest of New Mexico and its citizens.”

    Mesilla resident Jerry Garcia also embraced the resolution.

    “I like this idea,” Garcia said. “The sooner they make it happen, the better.”

  • By Steve Ramirez for the Las Cruces Sun-News

    04/09/2012

    MESILLA — Nathan Small and Jeff Steinborn, supporters of efforts to have the Organ Mountains-Desert Peaks designated as a national monument, preached to the choir Monday.

    In the end, the “choir” sang back, as the Mesilla board of trustees unanimously adopted a resolution that now includes the town as supporters of the initiative. Mesilla becomes the first municipality in southern New Mexico to officially endorse the efforts, although Las Cruces and Doña Ana County are soon expected to follow.

    “You could just as easily call this the Mesilla National Monument,” Small said. “Mesilla has long been a champion of preservation initiatives.”

    Small told trustees that efforts to get the monument designation are focused on history, culture and education. But while the designation would protect natural resources, it would also enhance southern New Mexico’s economy.

    “The Organ Mountains-Desert Peaks has been centered not only to our region but our nation as well,” Small said.

    He added the monument would have strong ties to Mesilla. Small pointed out that the Butterfield Stagecoach Trail traveled directly through Mesilla, and the town’s most infamous detainee, legendary outlaw Billy the Kid, also hid out at “Outlaw Rock,” which also would be included within the proposed monument.

    “Billy the Kid left inscriptions not only here in Mesilla, but at Outlaw Rock as well,” Small said.

    Steinborn said it was fitting that Mesilla became the first community in southern New Mexico to formally support efforts for the national designation.”Mesilla has a lot of history tied to the monument,” Steinborn said. “They’ve proven they’re already ahead of the game when it comes to preserving history.”

    Mayor Nora Barraza said it was important that Mesilla get behind the proposal.

    “Once this is destroyed it can never come back,” said Barraza, of what could happen if the national monument designation doesn’t occur. “As our communities grow on all sides this area will be destroyed.

    “Plus, this gives us the opportunities to share these treasured natural resources with our grandchildren and other generations to come. …We’re honored to be a part of this.”

    Trustee Jesus Caro Jr. agreed.

    “I fully support all the efforts,” Caro said. “It’s in the best interest of New Mexico and its citizens.”

    Mesilla resident Jerry Garcia also embraced the resolution.

    “I like this idea,” Garcia said. “The sooner they make it happen, the better.”

  • Today, we need your help in keeping grassroots pressure on Washington to ensure that two cultural and ecological jewels of the Southwest—the Organ Mountains-Desert Peaks and Rio Grande del Norte—stay on top of Obama’s list for permanent protection. Both of these diverse and wild landscapes are rich with New Mexico history and culture.

    The Organ Mountains-Desert Peaks National Monument proposal protects a New Mexico legacy spanning Pre-American, New Mexican, and American history that includes training sites for the Apollo Space Mission, the Butterfield Stagecoach TrailBilly the Kid’s Outlaw RockGeronimo’s Cave and thousands of Native American petroglyph’s and pictographs.

    The Río Grande Del Norte National Monument proposal safeguards thousands of archaeological sites that are associated with a diverse range of cultural traditions that span at least 11,000 years of human occupation. This area was revered as a sacred site to its prehistoric residents.

    With just an executive signature, we can protect our unique cultural heritage for generations to come, but we need your support to keep these monuments at the forefront of the administration’s priorities. 

    Your donations not only help us continue vital outreach to decision makers but also support our work with archaeologists, historians, geologists, anthropologists, geographers and the culturally diverse communities of New Mexico—all of which demonstrate the breadth of support for both of these national monuments.

    Please join us in protecting these important archaeological sites that hold the key to our past—and our future. Give your tax-deductible year end contribution now.

    Thank you for your ongoing support and keep it wild!

    Sincerely,

    NM Wild Campaign Team

    John Olivas, Traditional Community Organizer
    john olivasAs Traditional Community Organizer, Olivas represents traditional communities in northern New Mexico focusing his conservation work with grazing permittees, land grant members and Acequia Mayordomos and Parciantes. In addition to his role as traditional community organizer for NM Wild, Olivas is chairman of the Mora County Commission.
     
     
    Jeff Steinborn, Southern NM Director
    Jeff SteinbornSouthern NM Director Jeff Steinborn also serves as a newly elected state representative—he served in the same role from 2006-2010. He is a former aide to Senator Jeff Bingaman for southwest New Mexico, and a former legislative assistant to Congressman Bill Richardson.
     
     
    Nathan Small, Wilderness Protection Coordinator
    Nathan Quail Hunting web 222x250Small is a third generation New Mexican, avid outdoorsman and horseman. In addition to serving as NM Wild’s wilderness protection coordinator, Small represents District 4 on the Las Cruces City Council. He was re-elected to a second four-year term in November 2011.
     

    Donate Online

  • Today, we need your help in keeping grassroots pressure on Washington to ensure that two cultural and ecological jewels of the Southwest—the Organ Mountains-Desert Peaks and Rio Grande del Norte—stay on top of Obama’s list for permanent protection. Both of these diverse and wild landscapes are rich with New Mexico history and culture.

    The Organ Mountains-Desert Peaks National Monument proposal protects a New Mexico legacy spanning Pre-American, New Mexican, and American history that includes training sites for the Apollo Space Mission, the Butterfield Stagecoach TrailBilly the Kid’s Outlaw RockGeronimo’s Cave and thousands of Native American petroglyph’s and pictographs.

    The Río Grande Del Norte National Monument proposal safeguards thousands of archaeological sites that are associated with a diverse range of cultural traditions that span at least 11,000 years of human occupation. This area was revered as a sacred site to its prehistoric residents.

    With just an executive signature, we can protect our unique cultural heritage for generations to come, but we need your support to keep these monuments at the forefront of the administration’s priorities. 

    Your donations not only help us continue vital outreach to decision makers but also support our work with archaeologists, historians, geologists, anthropologists, geographers and the culturally diverse communities of New Mexico—all of which demonstrate the breadth of support for both of these national monuments.

    Please join us in protecting these important archaeological sites that hold the key to our past—and our future. Give your tax-deductible year end contribution now.

    Thank you for your ongoing support and keep it wild!

    Sincerely,

    NM Wild Campaign Team

    John Olivas, Traditional Community Organizer
    john olivasAs Traditional Community Organizer, Olivas represents traditional communities in northern New Mexico focusing his conservation work with grazing permittees, land grant members and Acequia Mayordomos and Parciantes. In addition to his role as traditional community organizer for NM Wild, Olivas is chairman of the Mora County Commission.
     
     
    Jeff Steinborn, Southern NM Director
    Jeff SteinbornSouthern NM Director Jeff Steinborn also serves as a newly elected state representative—he served in the same role from 2006-2010. He is a former aide to Senator Jeff Bingaman for southwest New Mexico, and a former legislative assistant to Congressman Bill Richardson.
     
     
    Nathan Small, Wilderness Protection Coordinator
    Nathan Quail Hunting web 222x250Small is a third generation New Mexican, avid outdoorsman and horseman. In addition to serving as NM Wild’s wilderness protection coordinator, Small represents District 4 on the Las Cruces City Council. He was re-elected to a second four-year term in November 2011.
     

    Donate Online

  • Today, we need your help in keeping grassroots pressure on Washington to ensure that two cultural and ecological jewels of the Southwest—the Organ Mountains-Desert Peaks and Rio Grande del Norte—stay on top of Obama’s list for permanent protection. Both of these diverse and wild landscapes are rich with New Mexico history and culture.

    The Organ Mountains-Desert Peaks National Monument proposal protects a New Mexico legacy spanning Pre-American, New Mexican, and American history that includes training sites for the Apollo Space Mission, the Butterfield Stagecoach TrailBilly the Kid’s Outlaw RockGeronimo’s Cave and thousands of Native American petroglyph’s and pictographs.

    The Río Grande Del Norte National Monument proposal safeguards thousands of archaeological sites that are associated with a diverse range of cultural traditions that span at least 11,000 years of human occupation. This area was revered as a sacred site to its prehistoric residents.

    With just an executive signature, we can protect our unique cultural heritage for generations to come, but we need your support to keep these monuments at the forefront of the administration’s priorities. 

    Your donations not only help us continue vital outreach to decision makers but also support our work with archaeologists, historians, geologists, anthropologists, geographers and the culturally diverse communities of New Mexico—all of which demonstrate the breadth of support for both of these national monuments.

    Please join us in protecting these important archaeological sites that hold the key to our past—and our future. Give your tax-deductible year end contribution now.

    Thank you for your ongoing support and keep it wild!

    Sincerely,

    NM Wild Campaign Team

    John Olivas, Traditional Community Organizer
    john olivasAs Traditional Community Organizer, Olivas represents traditional communities in northern New Mexico focusing his conservation work with grazing permittees, land grant members and Acequia Mayordomos and Parciantes. In addition to his role as traditional community organizer for NM Wild, Olivas is chairman of the Mora County Commission.
     
     
    Jeff Steinborn, Southern NM Director
    Jeff SteinbornSouthern NM Director Jeff Steinborn also serves as a newly elected state representative—he served in the same role from 2006-2010. He is a former aide to Senator Jeff Bingaman for southwest New Mexico, and a former legislative assistant to Congressman Bill Richardson.
     
     
    Nathan Small, Wilderness Protection Coordinator
    Nathan Quail Hunting web 222x250Small is a third generation New Mexican, avid outdoorsman and horseman. In addition to serving as NM Wild’s wilderness protection coordinator, Small represents District 4 on the Las Cruces City Council. He was re-elected to a second four-year term in November 2011.
     

    Donate Online

  • The Associated Press
    October 30, 2012

    ALBUQUERQUE, N.M.—Environmentalists and a group of scientists are criticizing a draft proposal that outlines options for releasing Mexican gray wolves into the wild. 

    The plan deals with releasing wolves from captive breeding facilities into the wild in Arizona to replace wolves that are either killed illegally or die from natural causes. 

    The document suggests the replacement wolves be selected to maximize genetic diversity of the wild population in Arizona and New Mexico. 

    The scientists and other critics have sent a letter to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, saying releases are needed but the plan doesn’t do enough to boost the wild population.
    They also argue that release decisions should hinge on the federal agency rather than guidelines from the Arizona Game and Fish Commission. 

    There are around 58 wolves in the wild along the New Mexico-Arizona border.

  • The Associated Press
    October 30, 2012

    ALBUQUERQUE, N.M.—Environmentalists and a group of scientists are criticizing a draft proposal that outlines options for releasing Mexican gray wolves into the wild. 

    The plan deals with releasing wolves from captive breeding facilities into the wild in Arizona to replace wolves that are either killed illegally or die from natural causes. 

    The document suggests the replacement wolves be selected to maximize genetic diversity of the wild population in Arizona and New Mexico. 

    The scientists and other critics have sent a letter to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, saying releases are needed but the plan doesn’t do enough to boost the wild population.
    They also argue that release decisions should hinge on the federal agency rather than guidelines from the Arizona Game and Fish Commission. 

    There are around 58 wolves in the wild along the New Mexico-Arizona border.

  • Jaymi Heimbuch, Treehugger.com
    September 21, 2011

    While grey wolf populations in the northern US still face persecution — from delisting from the Endangered Species List that is leading to court battles to a cull that could wipe out half of Wyoming’s wolf population— the Mexican grey wolf may be experiencing a glimmer of hope in the south. Though a plan to reintroduce the species to its historic habitat in Mexico is not without controversy. The Mexican grey wolf, a sub-species of the grey wolf, was essentially wiped out from the southwest by the 1970s. It was listed as endangered under the Endangered Species Act of 1973, and the US has made efforts toward a recovery of the species since then with reintroduction of the species in Arizona and New Mexico starting in 1998. Mexico has a captive breeding program with 66 wolves. And it is from that population that Mexico wants to try reintroducing wolves to the wild.

    Huffington Post reports, “The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and officials with the Arizona Department of Game and Fish recently learned of the plan by the Mexican government to release five captive-bred Mexican gray wolves at an undisclosed ranch in northeastern Sonora. Mexican officials on Tuesday [9/13/11] were still working on finding a suitable date for the release, said Laura Aguilar, a spokeswoman for the Mexican agency that oversees natural resources and the environment. The plan was first proposed in 2009 but has faced delays.”

    Though there has been a reintroduction program in the US since 1998, it has not been without problems. Of the 80 reintroduced wolves have have died from 1998 to 2010, 37 were shot illegally (and 12 more hit by vehicles). The program has also of course had its share of controversy with ranchers raising livestock. Concerns over the reintroduction of wolves in Mexico include what effect the reintroduction will have in other areas including the US side of the boarder, as well as how they will be tracked so that they can be monitored and dealt with should they prey on livestock herds within the US.

    According to Huffington Post, “Officials said the wolves that will be released in Mexico will be fitted with radio collars so they can be monitored. If they cross the border, the Fish and Wildlife Service said they will have the full protection of the federal Endangered Species Act as long as they are outside the boundaries of the wolf recovery area that spans southeastern Arizona and southwestern New Mexico. If the wolves are found within the recovery area, they will be considered as part of the experimental population — a classification that gives wildlife officials greater flexibility in managing the animals.”

    It would likely take awhile (if ever) before the wolves introduced in Mexico move into the boarder of the 4 million-acre reintroduction area in Arizona and New Mexico as it is located quite a bit north of the border.
    Map via USFWS

    The recovery for a top level predator like the wolf is fraught with controversy and conflict with humans. But there are strong efforts underway to bring the population back up to numbers that keep it safe from extinction. There are 47 Mexican Wolf breeding facilities in United States and Mexico — and reintroduction to the wild is the logical next step, wherever it might occur.

  • Jaymi Heimbuch, Treehugger.com
    September 21, 2011

    While grey wolf populations in the northern US still face persecution — from delisting from the Endangered Species List that is leading to court battles to a cull that could wipe out half of Wyoming’s wolf population— the Mexican grey wolf may be experiencing a glimmer of hope in the south. Though a plan to reintroduce the species to its historic habitat in Mexico is not without controversy. The Mexican grey wolf, a sub-species of the grey wolf, was essentially wiped out from the southwest by the 1970s. It was listed as endangered under the Endangered Species Act of 1973, and the US has made efforts toward a recovery of the species since then with reintroduction of the species in Arizona and New Mexico starting in 1998. Mexico has a captive breeding program with 66 wolves. And it is from that population that Mexico wants to try reintroducing wolves to the wild.

    Huffington Post reports, “The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and officials with the Arizona Department of Game and Fish recently learned of the plan by the Mexican government to release five captive-bred Mexican gray wolves at an undisclosed ranch in northeastern Sonora. Mexican officials on Tuesday [9/13/11] were still working on finding a suitable date for the release, said Laura Aguilar, a spokeswoman for the Mexican agency that oversees natural resources and the environment. The plan was first proposed in 2009 but has faced delays.”

    Though there has been a reintroduction program in the US since 1998, it has not been without problems. Of the 80 reintroduced wolves have have died from 1998 to 2010, 37 were shot illegally (and 12 more hit by vehicles). The program has also of course had its share of controversy with ranchers raising livestock. Concerns over the reintroduction of wolves in Mexico include what effect the reintroduction will have in other areas including the US side of the boarder, as well as how they will be tracked so that they can be monitored and dealt with should they prey on livestock herds within the US.

    According to Huffington Post, “Officials said the wolves that will be released in Mexico will be fitted with radio collars so they can be monitored. If they cross the border, the Fish and Wildlife Service said they will have the full protection of the federal Endangered Species Act as long as they are outside the boundaries of the wolf recovery area that spans southeastern Arizona and southwestern New Mexico. If the wolves are found within the recovery area, they will be considered as part of the experimental population — a classification that gives wildlife officials greater flexibility in managing the animals.”

    It would likely take awhile (if ever) before the wolves introduced in Mexico move into the boarder of the 4 million-acre reintroduction area in Arizona and New Mexico as it is located quite a bit north of the border.
    Map via USFWS

    The recovery for a top level predator like the wolf is fraught with controversy and conflict with humans. But there are strong efforts underway to bring the population back up to numbers that keep it safe from extinction. There are 47 Mexican Wolf breeding facilities in United States and Mexico — and reintroduction to the wild is the logical next step, wherever it might occur.

  • Read a reviewof Wild Harmonies with Hélène Grimaud from pianist and composer Charles Blanchard. The event took place October 23 at the Lensic in Santa Fe and proceeds benefit the Wolf Conservation Center and the New Mexico Wilderness Alliance wolf fund. Unable to attend? Please consider giving now. Learn more about our campaign for Mexican wolves.

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