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2012

  • Read a reviewof Wild Harmonies with Hélène Grimaud from pianist and composer Charles Blanchard. The event took place October 23 at the Lensic in Santa Fe and proceeds benefit the Wolf Conservation Center and the New Mexico Wilderness Alliance wolf fund. Unable to attend? Please consider giving now. Learn more about our campaign for Mexican wolves.

  • Dear Friend,

     

    We’re on the brink of two new national monuments in New Mexico, and we’ve got great news.

    There is evidence that the creation of two new national monuments in New Mexico—the Organ Mountains-Desert Peaks and Rio Grande del Norte, would significantly benefit local economies in the long term.

    As we sit on the cusp of gaining permanent protection for these two New Mexico gems we still need your ongoing support. Please give a year end tax-deductible gift to help push for two new national monuments.

    According to a new study cited by the Taos County Chamber of Commerce, designating the Rio Grande del Norte as a national monument would have a “significant” impact on the local economy, resulting in an annual economic impact of approximately $15 million, and creating nearly 300 new jobs. National monument designation would be equally beneficial in southern New Mexico—visitors to the nearby White Sands National Monument spent $15.7 million in the local economy in 2008.

    Please stand for New Mexico’s lands and people by giving today. Your gift will be matched dollar for dollar from now until January 1.

    With your gift you not only help us protect some of New Mexico’s most historically, culturally and ecologically important lands, but you’ll also be making a stand for New Mexico’s struggling economy. You’ll help bring CLEAN jobs into the state and generate revenue for LOCAL businesses.

    Thank you for all you help us do for New Mexico’s wild places.

    Donate Online

  • Dear Friend,

     

    We’re on the brink of two new national monuments in New Mexico, and we’ve got great news.

    There is evidence that the creation of two new national monuments in New Mexico—the Organ Mountains-Desert Peaks and Rio Grande del Norte, would significantly benefit local economies in the long term.

    As we sit on the cusp of gaining permanent protection for these two New Mexico gems we still need your ongoing support. Please give a year end tax-deductible gift to help push for two new national monuments.

    According to a new study cited by the Taos County Chamber of Commerce, designating the Rio Grande del Norte as a national monument would have a “significant” impact on the local economy, resulting in an annual economic impact of approximately $15 million, and creating nearly 300 new jobs. National monument designation would be equally beneficial in southern New Mexico—visitors to the nearby White Sands National Monument spent $15.7 million in the local economy in 2008.

    Please stand for New Mexico’s lands and people by giving today. Your gift will be matched dollar for dollar from now until January 1.

    With your gift you not only help us protect some of New Mexico’s most historically, culturally and ecologically important lands, but you’ll also be making a stand for New Mexico’s struggling economy. You’ll help bring CLEAN jobs into the state and generate revenue for LOCAL businesses.

    Thank you for all you help us do for New Mexico’s wild places.

    Donate Online

  • Dear Friend,

     

    We’re on the brink of two new national monuments in New Mexico, and we’ve got great news.

    There is evidence that the creation of two new national monuments in New Mexico—the Organ Mountains-Desert Peaks and Rio Grande del Norte, would significantly benefit local economies in the long term.

    As we sit on the cusp of gaining permanent protection for these two New Mexico gems we still need your ongoing support. Please give a year end tax-deductible gift to help push for two new national monuments.

    According to a new study cited by the Taos County Chamber of Commerce, designating the Rio Grande del Norte as a national monument would have a “significant” impact on the local economy, resulting in an annual economic impact of approximately $15 million, and creating nearly 300 new jobs. National monument designation would be equally beneficial in southern New Mexico—visitors to the nearby White Sands National Monument spent $15.7 million in the local economy in 2008.

    Please stand for New Mexico’s lands and people by giving today. Your gift will be matched dollar for dollar from now until January 1.

    With your gift you not only help us protect some of New Mexico’s most historically, culturally and ecologically important lands, but you’ll also be making a stand for New Mexico’s struggling economy. You’ll help bring CLEAN jobs into the state and generate revenue for LOCAL businesses.

    Thank you for all you help us do for New Mexico’s wild places.

    Donate Online

  • Wolves Belong 1E 250x69

    This week’s eNews includes information about our push for two new national monuments in New Mexico, an invite to our annual holiday party and pre-order information for the Wild Guide and Wolves Belong bumper sticker!

    Read our eNews now.

  • By Garrett VeneKlasen, Albuquerque Journal Guest Opinion

    March 17, 2012

    Everyone has a story and everyone has history. Tragically, most of us have lost or somehow forgotten important pieces of our story in the passing of generations. Some have a name for this – they call it “progress.”

    New Mexico is one of the few states in our union that has a complete historical and cultural record with unbroken ties back to the origin of its traditional, land-based cultures. This epic tale – which is steeped in diversity, tradition and heritage – starts something like this:

    In the beginning there was nothing but an endless expanse of wild and pristine country completely devoid of humans. Then perhaps 13,000 years ago, a small band of Paleoamericans, the Llano Culture, appeared in our story. And so began the rich cultural history of man upon the wild New Mexican landscape. Over time, the pueblos evolved, followed by Francisco Coronado and his fellow conquistadors, who first explored the Rio Grande Valley in 1540. Like the tribal peoples who came before them, the Spanish settlers who followed and remained upon the untamed land were soon irrevocably transformed by it.

    New Mexico’s historical record is a sacred text that begins with one word – wilderness! Our state’s remaining wild places are irreplaceable, iconic cultural heirlooms. Wilderness is the genesis of New Mexico’s story. It is the first sentence in the first chapter of our epic tale; it is undeniably the sacred cornerstone of New Mexican culture. And these last vestiges of New Mexico’s wild lands must be preserved, honored and protected.

    Of these sacred lands, I cannot think of two more worthy of protective designation than the Columbine Hondo and El Rio Grande del Norte, both in the northern part of our state. The Columbine Hondo is only 46,000 acres of rugged, critically important alpine headwater terrain in the Carson National Forest. The Rio Grande del Norte corridor, comprising approximately 236,000 acres of Bureau of Land Management lands, is the very heart and soul of northern New Mexico’s traditional cultural agrarian epicenter.

    The focal antihero in this saga is time. Time is running out for our wild lands. Some members of Congress would love to see these currently unprotected lands either sold off to private hands or developed in the name of “prosperity and progress.”

    As we speak, there are a host of bills in Congress cleverly designed to pillage the last pockets of unspoiled backcountry. If they pass, the beginning of New Mexico’s epic tale could someday soon be replaced with Chinese pulp mills, exclusive “ranchette” subdivisions, strip mines and clear cuts. Considering the political agenda of an increasingly ideologue-led Congress, the reality of this is much more plausible than one might think.

    Just 472 years ago, nearly the entire landscape of New Mexico was wild and untamed. Back then, our Native peoples and Spanish settlers were peoples of the land. These cultures are so solidly rooted in wilderness that the two simply cannot be considered as separate entities.

    Despite the odds, relics of the “original wild” still exist in isolated islands within the state’s ever-expanding sea of development and modernization. Our generation, through a local community and citizen-based federal legislative process, has a unique opportunity to protect these places so that future generations might have a direct tie to their past.

    We owe this push for protection on our most cherished wild public lands to our children and grandchildren. Without a solid connection to their cultural past, how can they forge a meaningful future? As part of a diverse, bipartisan coalition of stakeholders – ranging from tribal interests, land grant concessions, grazing permittees, community leaders, businesses, sportsmen, homeowners, and conservationists – we have stood up in support for the protection of these precious lands.

    I urge all across the state, regardless of political affiliation or personal self interest, to encourage our congressional delegates to protect the Columbine Hondo and Rio Grande del Norte now or risk forever losing your cultural and biological integrity in the name of “progress and prosperity.”

    Garrett VeneKlasen is the New Mexico Public Lands Coordinator for Trout Unlimited.

  • July 2012

    In the aftermath of its June 30, 2012, Board Meeting, the NM Wild Board of Directors has approved the following Energy Position Statement:

    “NEW MEXICO WILDERNESS ALLIANCE (NM WILD) OPPOSES ENERGY DEVELOPMENT, GENERATING FACILITIES, EXTRACTIVE OPERATIONS AND POWER-AND PIPELINES WITHIN ROADLESS AREAS ON PUBLIC LANDS, AND IN OTHER AREAS WITH SIGNIFICANT WILDERNESS AND/OR WILDLIFE VALUES. NM WILD RECOGNIZES THE NEED FOR CLEAN ENERGY SOURCES AND SUPPORTS ENVIRONMENTALLY RESPONSIBLE ENERGY DEVELOPMENT WITHIN ALREADY DEVELOPED LANDS, WHICH MAY INCLUDE INDUSTRIALIZED REGIONS, FARMLAND AND ESTABLISHED TRANSPORTATION CORRIDORS.”

  • Washington, D.C. – The Sierra Club and NCLR (National Council of La Raza) announced a new national survey today, finding that nearly 90 percent of Latino voters favor clean energy over fossil fuels. The national poll surveyed 1,131 Latino registered voters across the country on a number of public health, environmental and energy issues, and found overwhelming support for clean energy innovation, protecting public lands and parks and cleaning up toxic pollution.

    “The Sierra Club is encouraged and energized to hear that Latino voters not only see the importance of environmental and public health protections, but that they are also willing to take action to help build a healthier economy, nation and future with clean energy,” said Javier Sierra, Sierra Club Bilingual Media Strategist.  “It’s time for our nation’s leaders to catch up and usher in a clean energy economy that provides good jobs and healthy families.”

    “The findings from this survey amplify what NCLR has been hearing at the community level from Latinos throughout the country: quality jobs, quality air and water, and quality of life are goals that can and should be achieved simultaneously,” said Eric Rodriguez, Vice President of the Office of Research, Advocacy, and Legislation at NCLR. “And working with the Sierra Club and other partners we look forward to putting these priorities into action in order to not only achieve employment opportunities for Latinos in the clean jobs sector, but to also create a healthier environment for all Americans.”

    The results of the 2012 Latinos and the Environment survey show that Latino voters across the country strongly support clean energy, are very concerned about the public health effects of fossil fuel production and use, believe that global climate change is happening, and want to protect the nation’s public lands.

    Some key findings:

    • Pollution of our air and water resources is still the top environmental concern for Latino voters nationwide, with 61% saying it is among the top two environmental issues for them and their families. Since 2008, concern about air and water pollution and toxic waste sites has grown by 10 percentage points. 
    • The Latino population clearly favors clean energy over dirty fossil fuels, and 83% agree that “coal plants and oil refineries are a thing of the past. We need to look toward the future and use more energy from clean sources.”
    • Nearly 9-in-10 (87%) Latino voters, with all wages and benefits equal, would prefer to work in the clean energy industry rather than at a fossil fuel company or oil refinery.
    • Of those polled, 86% prefer that the government invest in clean, renewable energy like solar and wind, while just 11% of Latinos prefer investments in fossil fuels like coal, oil, and gas.
    • More than three-fourths (77%) of Latino voters believe that global climate change is already happening, while another 15% say it will happen in the future. By comparison, about half (52%) of all Americans say that the effects of global warming have already begun, according to a Gallup poll conducted in March.
    • More than 9-in-10 (92%) Latino voters agree that they “have a moral responsibility to take care of God’s creations on this earth – the wilderness and forests, the oceans, lakes and rivers.”
    • More than 9-in-10 Latino voters (94%) say outdoor activities such as fishing, picnics, camping, and visiting national parks and monuments are important to them and their families. Nearly 7-in-10 (69%) Latino voters say they would support the president designating more public land as national monuments.
    • More than 7-in-10 (72%) Latino voters agree that “environmental regulations protect our health and our families by lowering toxic levels of mercury, arsenic, carbon dioxide and other life-threatening pollution in our air and water.”
    • An overwhelming majority (94%) of Latino voters believe that they and their families can help curb toxic air and water pollution by conserving energy.

    The 2012 Latinos and the Environment poll was conducted by Myers Research and Strategic Services and focus group data was provided by Project New America. To read the executive summary or find the full poll results, visit www.sierraclub.org/ecocentro/survey.

  • Snag Films just released a documentary on Otero Mesa, featuring NM Wild Associate Director Nathan Newcomer. Preview it now:

  • Snag Films just released a documentary on Otero Mesa, featuring NM Wild Associate Director Nathan Newcomer. Preview it now:

  • By Walter Rubel, Las Cruces Sun-News
    October 27, 2012

    The letter sent last week by Sens. Jeff Bingaman and Tom Udall urging President Barack Obama to consider using his powers under the Antiquities Act to designate a national monument for the Organ Mountains and other areas in Doña Ana County could accelerate a process that has been stalled in Congress.

    “He’s listened. His secretary of the interior has listened. The grassroots movement has spoken to him and to his people. And I would not be surprised, come the first of the year, if the president made the declaration and signed the papers, on a recommendation from his secretary of the interior,” Udall said Friday during a visit to the Sun-News.

    Meanwhile, Rep. Steve Pearce sent his own letter to the president last week, seeking his “reassurance that no new national monuments or wilderness areas will be designated by your administration in the 2nd Congressional District of New Mexico.”

    That pretty much explains why, for the first time, Udall and Bingaman have turned to the president to resolve the issue. They still haven’t given up on legislation, Udall said. He even held out hope that their letter could be the spark that leads to passage of legislation in the lame duck session.

    But that doesn’t seem likely. Ours is one of 27 wilderness bills now languishing in Congress, according to the Wilderness Society, which noted that the current Congress is on track to become only the second since the Wilderness Act was passed in 1964 not to add a single acre to our nation’s protected lands.

    With Pearce leading the opposition in the Republican-controlled House, it would seem doubtful there would be agreement from that body, if legislation cleared the Senate. And, there will be more pressing matters, like the sequestration bill, farm bill and expiration of the Bush tax cuts, all demanding attention in the short lame duck session.

    This will be the last session for Bingaman, who as chairman of the Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee has been a leader in the effort to preserve public lands. While that make not make a difference in his effort to get legislation passed, it could mean something to Obama. The president has declared his desire to see more public lands preserved, but thus far has little to show in that regard.

    Our proposed national monument was one of two Udall and Bingaman urged the president to consider in their letter. The other is the Rio Grande Gorge and adjacent Taos Plateau in Taos and Rio Arriba counties.

    Udall said that in preparing the legislation they tried to work with all the stakeholders. When the local chamber raised issues about border security, they increased the Border Patrol buffer zone. But, when Republicans took over the House in 2010, it became more difficult to build consensus on wilderness issues.

    “We just concluded in the last couple of weeks, lets put another option on the table,” he said. “The letter doesn’t mean we’ve given up on the legislation. It just means we’ve reached the point where maybe we should put both options on the table and see what happens.”

    There are small differences between the legislation and the proposed Organ Mountains-Desert Peaks National Monument proposed by local wilderness advocates. Udall said it would be up to the secretary of the interior, working with local officials and advocates, to determine exactly what the monument would look like if the president acts.

    “The secretary of the interior has been very involved with the local groups on this and he knows full well what’s in our legislation,” Udall said. “When you’re dealing with the president doing something under the Antiquities Act, he benefits from all his agencies talking to him, Homeland Security and public lands agencies.”

    Walter Rubel is managing editor of the Sun-News. He can be reached at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or follow @WalterRubel on Twitter.

  • By Walter Rubel, Las Cruces Sun-News
    October 27, 2012

    The letter sent last week by Sens. Jeff Bingaman and Tom Udall urging President Barack Obama to consider using his powers under the Antiquities Act to designate a national monument for the Organ Mountains and other areas in Doña Ana County could accelerate a process that has been stalled in Congress.

    “He’s listened. His secretary of the interior has listened. The grassroots movement has spoken to him and to his people. And I would not be surprised, come the first of the year, if the president made the declaration and signed the papers, on a recommendation from his secretary of the interior,” Udall said Friday during a visit to the Sun-News.

    Meanwhile, Rep. Steve Pearce sent his own letter to the president last week, seeking his “reassurance that no new national monuments or wilderness areas will be designated by your administration in the 2nd Congressional District of New Mexico.”

    That pretty much explains why, for the first time, Udall and Bingaman have turned to the president to resolve the issue. They still haven’t given up on legislation, Udall said. He even held out hope that their letter could be the spark that leads to passage of legislation in the lame duck session.

    But that doesn’t seem likely. Ours is one of 27 wilderness bills now languishing in Congress, according to the Wilderness Society, which noted that the current Congress is on track to become only the second since the Wilderness Act was passed in 1964 not to add a single acre to our nation’s protected lands.

    With Pearce leading the opposition in the Republican-controlled House, it would seem doubtful there would be agreement from that body, if legislation cleared the Senate. And, there will be more pressing matters, like the sequestration bill, farm bill and expiration of the Bush tax cuts, all demanding attention in the short lame duck session.

    This will be the last session for Bingaman, who as chairman of the Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee has been a leader in the effort to preserve public lands. While that make not make a difference in his effort to get legislation passed, it could mean something to Obama. The president has declared his desire to see more public lands preserved, but thus far has little to show in that regard.

    Our proposed national monument was one of two Udall and Bingaman urged the president to consider in their letter. The other is the Rio Grande Gorge and adjacent Taos Plateau in Taos and Rio Arriba counties.

    Udall said that in preparing the legislation they tried to work with all the stakeholders. When the local chamber raised issues about border security, they increased the Border Patrol buffer zone. But, when Republicans took over the House in 2010, it became more difficult to build consensus on wilderness issues.

    “We just concluded in the last couple of weeks, lets put another option on the table,” he said. “The letter doesn’t mean we’ve given up on the legislation. It just means we’ve reached the point where maybe we should put both options on the table and see what happens.”

    There are small differences between the legislation and the proposed Organ Mountains-Desert Peaks National Monument proposed by local wilderness advocates. Udall said it would be up to the secretary of the interior, working with local officials and advocates, to determine exactly what the monument would look like if the president acts.

    “The secretary of the interior has been very involved with the local groups on this and he knows full well what’s in our legislation,” Udall said. “When you’re dealing with the president doing something under the Antiquities Act, he benefits from all his agencies talking to him, Homeland Security and public lands agencies.”

    Walter Rubel is managing editor of the Sun-News. He can be reached at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or follow @WalterRubel on Twitter.

  • FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Jan. 30, 2012
    MEDIA CONTACT – NEW MEXICO CONTEXT:
    Chris Cervini, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.; 505-980-6110
    MEDIA CONTACT – POLLING DETAILS:
    Leslie Weddell, Colorado College This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.; 719-389-6038

    NEW MEXICO VOTERS ACROSS POLITICAL SPECTRUM AGREE:
    OUR PUBLIC LANDS ARE ESSENTIAL TO OUR ECONOMY
    NEW SURVEY FINDS NEW MEXICO VOTERS SUPPORT UPHOLDING ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTIONS

    COLORADO SPRINGS, CO – The results from the 2012 Colorado College State of the Rockies Conservation in the West poll find that New Mexico voters across the political spectrum – from Tea Party supporters to those who identify with the Occupy Wall Street movement and voters in-between – support upholding protections for clean air, clean water, natural areas and wildlife. Voters view New Mexico’s parks and public lands as essential to their state’s economy, and quality of life.

    The survey, completed by Lori Weigel of Public Opinion Strategies (a Republican firm) and Dave Metz of Fairbank, Maslin, Maullin, Metz & Associates (a Democratic firm), found that 80 percent of voters view having a strong economy and protections for New Mexico’s land and water as compatible with each other.

    Voters reject the idea that reducing regulations creates jobs. In particular, 73 percent of New Mexican voters think that the state should maintain industry regulations that protect land, air, and water in New Mexico, and said that regulations have a positive effect on public safety (approximately 71 percent), the natural beauty of the state (76 percent), and residents’ quality of life (73 percent).

    Approximately 73 percent of New Mexican voters also said that the loss of habitat for fish and wildlife is a serious problem in their state; nearly 9 in 10 voters said water pollution and inadequate water supplies are serious problems. In addition, over 60 percent felt that development of public lands by private companies should not limit the public’s ability to access and enjoy these lands.

    “Healthy public lands make it possible for thousands of New Mexican families to hunt and fish, and to pass on their love of the outdoors to their kids. In turn, that strong hunting and fishing tradition creates jobs and opportunity for small businesses,” said Joel Gay, a spokesman for the New Mexico Wildlife Federation. “Everyone in New Mexico benefits from protected public lands.”

    New Mexican voters also see renewable energy as a job creator: 70 percent believe it renewable energy sources like wind and solar will create new jobs in New Mexico. Seven in 10 want to see the state uphold the existing standard for the amount of energy to be met by renewable sources like wind and solar.

    In a state with several national parks and monuments, the Colorado College poll found that by nearly two to one (63 percent to 33 percent), New Mexican voters support designating more existing public lands as national monuments. These findings are consistent with recent polling of New Mexico Latino voters.

    “Both Republican and Democratic Presidents have designated national monuments on public lands in New Mexico. Thanks to their leadership, places like White Sands, Carlsbad Caverns, Bandelier and Chaco Canyon have remained among the most beloved treasures of our state. It’s no surprise New Mexicans are supportive of new national monuments,” said Mary Lee Ortega, President of Organizers in the Land of Enchantment (OLÉ).

    By a margin of 65 percent to 25 percent, New Mexican voters also believe suspending environmental laws along the U.S. border to address illegal immigration is unnecessary.

    The poll surveyed 2,400 registered voters in six key western states (AZ, CO, NM, UT, WY, MT) January 2 through 5 and 7, 2012, and yields a margin of error of + 2.0 percent nationwide and +4.9 statewide.

    The full survey and individual state surveys are available on the Colorado College website

  • Nov. 28, 2012

    For immediate release by New Mexico Wildlife Federation and Trout Unlimited

    (ALBUQUERQUE) – A new video released today by New Mexico Wildlife Federation and Trout Unlimited explores the lasting conservation legacy of retiring U.S. Senator Jeff Bingaman.

    Through his efforts to protect public lands valued by hunters and anglers, Bingaman has left an indelible mark on New Mexico and in particular on sportsmen. During his 30-year career in Washington, Bingaman worked to help New Mexico build a modern economy while also taking great pains to protect the state’s wild and untouched places for sportsmen and outdoors enthusiasts for generations to come.

    The video celebrating Bingaman’s conservation legacy can be seen here.

    “New Mexico is a better place thanks to Senator Bingaman’s tireless and thoughtful efforts to protect public lands,” said Kent Salazar, a lifelong Albuquerque hunter and angler and former president of the New Mexico Wildlife Federation. “His hard work in Congress has improved and protected outdoor activities such as hunting, fishing and hiking for sportsmen like me. Thanks to his efforts, Senator Bingaman has helped ensure that all New Mexicans have the opportunity to enjoy our state’s natural gifts.”

    Senator Bingaman has been a consistent champion for the Land and Water Conservation Fund, which has provided more than $243 million to help protect special places throughout the state and has helped ensure access across New Mexico for hunting, fishing and other outdoor activities.

    Bingaman also worked to establish the Collaborative Forest Restoration Program, which has funded 166 forest restoration projects in New Mexico since 2001. The Omnibus Public Lands Management Act of 2009, also supported by Senator Bingaman, protected more than 2 million acres of public land across the United States. 

    “By championing conservation legislation, Bingaman has ensured that our children and grandchildren will be able to enjoy the best public lands in New Mexico as part of their heritage,” said Toner Mitchell, president of the Truchas Chapter of Trout Unlimited.

    Despite announcing his retirement in 2011, Senator Bingaman has continued to focus on New Mexico’s public lands for the sake of future generations by calling for two new national monuments in the state. 

    “Senator Bingaman recognizes the importance of New Mexico’s public lands, and he continues to advocate for their protection,” said Salazar. “As residents of New Mexico, we all benefit from protection of our wild places. Senator Bingaman wants us to continue to enjoy these activities, and that’s why he’s done the hard part of speaking for us in Washington. His conservation legacy in the Land of Enchantment will never fade.”

    For additional information, contact:

    Kent Salazar, former NMWF president, (505) 220-7083

    Joel Gay, New Mexico Wildlife Federation, (505) 299-5404

    Garrett VeneKlasen, NM Public Lands Coordinator for Trout Unlimited, (505) 670-2925

    Toner Mitchell, Truchas Chapter president of Trout Unlimited, (505) 231-8860

  • New Wyoming Wolf Management Plan Proposes Killing Half of States’ Wolves

    Mat McDermott, Treehugger.com
    July 8, 2011

    Wolves can’t seem to catch a break: Interior Secretary Ken Salazar and US Fish and Wildlife Service director Dan Ashe have “struck a deal” with Wyoming governor Matt Mead that will see the number of wolves in Wyoming reduced by half to just 100 individuals and 10 breeding pairs outside those in Yellowstone National Park. At the end of 2010 there were just 230 individual wolves in the state. The only good news in that is that the further negotiation and public extends to the fall.

    Defenders of Wildlife is urging to call the Fish & Wildlife Service at 800-344-WILD (9453) to express your dissatisfaction with the new Wyoming wolf management plan.

  • New Wyoming Wolf Management Plan Proposes Killing Half of States’ Wolves

    Mat McDermott, Treehugger.com
    July 8, 2011

    Wolves can’t seem to catch a break: Interior Secretary Ken Salazar and US Fish and Wildlife Service director Dan Ashe have “struck a deal” with Wyoming governor Matt Mead that will see the number of wolves in Wyoming reduced by half to just 100 individuals and 10 breeding pairs outside those in Yellowstone National Park. At the end of 2010 there were just 230 individual wolves in the state. The only good news in that is that the further negotiation and public extends to the fall.

    Defenders of Wildlife is urging to call the Fish & Wildlife Service at 800-344-WILD (9453) to express your dissatisfaction with the new Wyoming wolf management plan.

  • Intimacy & Agency: Challenging Preconceptions About Nature
    Lecture: Tuesday, September 18, 6:30pm
    presented by Western New Mexico University 

    The WNMU Artists in Lecture Series presents a talk by New Mexico Wilderness Alliance artist-in-residence for ISEA2012, Marina Zurkow. She discusses her culminating artwork focusing on the co-existence of critically endangered Mexican gray wolves and people in the Gila ecosystem. Zurkow is a Guggenheim Fellow, and is on the faculty of the Tisch School for the Arts at New York University. Her project is represented with an artwork in the portion of the main ISEA2012 exhibition at 516 ARTS. More info: ISEA2012 residencies

    LOCATION: Western New Mexico University, Parotti Hall
    1000 W. College St., Silver City, 575-538-6011, www.mimbresarts.org/artistlectureseries.html

  • NM Wild board member and artist Michael Berman recently received a Centennial 2012 Governor’s Award for Excellence in the Arts. Established in 1974 by Governor Bruce King and First Lady Alice King, the Governor’s Arts Awards celebrate the role that artists, crafts people, and arts supporters play in the cultural and economic life of New Mexico. The awards are given to living artists and arts supporters who have demonstrated lifetime achievement in their art form or contributions to the arts in New Mexico.

    Berman, who lives in San Lorenzo has photographed the desert southwest for over three decades and captured its dramatic surroundings in compelling landscape prints.  Born in 1956 in New York City, Berman came west to study biology at Colorado College.  He later received his masters of fine arts from Arizona State University.  Berman has lived for 34 years in San Lorenzo on the edge of the Gila National Forest, the focus of his next book, currently in production at the Museum of New Mexico Press.  As part of his commitment to the Gila wilderness, Berman took part in the New Mexico BLM Wilderness Photography Survey in 1996, and became a founding board member of the Gila Resource Information Project in 1997.  His landscape photography reflects his strong interest in ecology developed through his early studies, and his images call attention to wild places that are under threat.  He donates his time and artwork to conservation organizations, including the Gila Conservation Coalition.  His work is represented in the permanent collections of many museums, including the New Mexico Museum of Art, Santa Fe; Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York; the Amon Carter Museum in Fort Worth, Texas; the Denver Art Museum; the Cleveland Museum of Art; and the Yale University Art Gallery.  In 2008, Berman received a prestigious fellowship from the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation for his work Grasslands: The Chihuahuan Desert Project.

    During its over thirty-year existence, a diverse and prestigious list of painters, weavers, sculptors, dancers, musicians, storyteller, poets, actors, playwrights, potters, and other outstanding individuals and organizations have been honored. Nominations for the awards are invited each year from arts groups and individuals. All nominations are reviewed by a committee of the New Mexico Arts Commission, which sends its recommendations to the full commission and to the governor. The Governor’s Awards for Excellence in the Arts continue to evolve with the ever-changing arts world so that the impact and relevance of the awards persist.

    The Centennial 2012 Governor’s Arts Awards ceremonies will be held on Friday, September 14, 5:15 -7:00 p.m. at the St. Francis Auditorium, New Mexico Museum of Art in Santa Fe. A public reception and exhibition opening will be held from 3:30 – 4:30 p.m. in the Governor’s Gallery, 4th Floor, State Capitol. Both events are free and open to the public.

  • mar 14 weekly

  • Associated Press

    February 20, 2012

    The number of endangered Mexican gray wolves in New Mexico and Arizona continues to rise. State and federal biologists found at least 58 wolves in their latest count, up from 50 the previous year and 42 in 2009.

    Arizona State University biology professor Philip Hedrick calls the increase good news, but says the best news is that the number of breeding pairs has risen from two to six.

    “If you think about it, that’s only 12 animals that are contributing to the next generation for this year, so that’s not a huge number – even though it’s a lot better than just two, last year.”

    The total wolf count needs to be much larger in order to produce a long-term stable and sustainable population – perhaps four times as many wolves, Hedrick explains. That increase would not sit well with ranchers in western New Mexico and eastern Arizona, who have long complained that the wolves kill cattle and sheep.

    Kim McCreery is a staff scientist for the New Mexico Wilderness Alliance. She says a few pairs of breeding wolves are not enough for genetic diversity, which means reduced litter size and an increase in pup mortality. McCreery adds that what is needed for a healthier population is more wolves on the ground. She suspects that politics may be getting in the way.

    “We need a rule change. We need U.S. Fish and Wildlife to change a rule saying that captive-bred wolves can only be released in the primary recovery zone, which is in Arizona.”

    While seeking changes in regulations that limit wolf releases in New Mexico, McCreery says scientists are conducting an experimental program: training wolves to reject the taste of livestock.

    “The wolves have been conditioned to not want to eat something because they associate it with a chemical that doesn’t taste good to them, that kind of makes them feel, for a while, not very good.”

    The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has worked with ranchers to keep the wolves away from livestock, noting that only one problem wolf has had to be permanently removed in the past five years.

    The Mexican gray wolf reintroduction program began in 1998, with a goal of 100 wolves by 2006.

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