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2012

  • Jerry James Stone, Treehugger.com
    April 13, 2011

    Congress, for the first time ever, has removed an animal from the Endangered Species List. Unfortunately, for the northern Rocky Mountain grey wolf, it was caught in the crossfire (soon to be literally!) of last Friday’s Federal Budget compromise and is no longer considered endangered. “The Environmental Protection Agency was cut by $1.6 billion, a 16-percent reduction, and lawmakers from Western states were able to include a rider allowing states to de-list wolves from the endangered species list,” explains Brian Merchant, about Friday’s decision. The rider puts the management of grey wolves in the hands of both Montana and Idaho. Though, just last week a, federal judge bucked this idea because he felt it would actually increase commercial wolf hunts within those states.

    Whats’ really obscene to me is that Congress has actually set this precedent. Okay, it’s not really the first time. Congress did inadvertently delist an endangered Tennessee fish called the snail darter by approving a dam originally slated to protect the fish. But the difference being that Congress was not overturning scientific findings, it was a legislative loophole.

    While Obama and Reid stood firm against attacks on the Clean Air Act, they clearly caved to pressure from special interest groups on this matter. However, I am not really surprised that Obama fell short here as he did back the Bush administration’s attempt at delisting the animal before. However, the HuffPo points out that wildlife advocates could very well pressure Obama and Reid with an ad campaign, much like the Palin-centric one above.
    The ad worked in spades — according to independent research by the Muhlenberg College Institute of Public Opinion, it was one of the most effective spots of the entire 2008 election cycle. According to Glenn Kesller of HCD Research, which conducted the study: The ad which focuses on Governor Palin’s record regarding the treatment of wildlife in Alaska seemed to strike a chord with voters. The recent ads from both parties have had little impact among voters. This is the first ad in over a month that seems to have broken through. (source)

    All may not be lost for the grey wolf just yet. Conservation groups, hunters and Defenders of Wildlife just stopped a piece of Montana Legislature that would have expanded wolf-killing on private property. The proposed Montana Wolf Control Act (SB 414) made it legal for anyone to shoot a wolf at any time, for any reason, on private land.

    You can tell Congress to remove the outrageous wolf-delisting rider from the 2011 budget here. Regardless, it seems like it is a good day to be an elk in Montana.

  • Jerry James Stone, Treehugger.com
    April 13, 2011

    Congress, for the first time ever, has removed an animal from the Endangered Species List. Unfortunately, for the northern Rocky Mountain grey wolf, it was caught in the crossfire (soon to be literally!) of last Friday’s Federal Budget compromise and is no longer considered endangered. “The Environmental Protection Agency was cut by $1.6 billion, a 16-percent reduction, and lawmakers from Western states were able to include a rider allowing states to de-list wolves from the endangered species list,” explains Brian Merchant, about Friday’s decision. The rider puts the management of grey wolves in the hands of both Montana and Idaho. Though, just last week a, federal judge bucked this idea because he felt it would actually increase commercial wolf hunts within those states.

    Whats’ really obscene to me is that Congress has actually set this precedent. Okay, it’s not really the first time. Congress did inadvertently delist an endangered Tennessee fish called the snail darter by approving a dam originally slated to protect the fish. But the difference being that Congress was not overturning scientific findings, it was a legislative loophole.

    While Obama and Reid stood firm against attacks on the Clean Air Act, they clearly caved to pressure from special interest groups on this matter. However, I am not really surprised that Obama fell short here as he did back the Bush administration’s attempt at delisting the animal before. However, the HuffPo points out that wildlife advocates could very well pressure Obama and Reid with an ad campaign, much like the Palin-centric one above.
    The ad worked in spades — according to independent research by the Muhlenberg College Institute of Public Opinion, it was one of the most effective spots of the entire 2008 election cycle. According to Glenn Kesller of HCD Research, which conducted the study: The ad which focuses on Governor Palin’s record regarding the treatment of wildlife in Alaska seemed to strike a chord with voters. The recent ads from both parties have had little impact among voters. This is the first ad in over a month that seems to have broken through. (source)

    All may not be lost for the grey wolf just yet. Conservation groups, hunters and Defenders of Wildlife just stopped a piece of Montana Legislature that would have expanded wolf-killing on private property. The proposed Montana Wolf Control Act (SB 414) made it legal for anyone to shoot a wolf at any time, for any reason, on private land.

    You can tell Congress to remove the outrageous wolf-delisting rider from the 2011 budget here. Regardless, it seems like it is a good day to be an elk in Montana.

  •  
    U.S. SENATOR MARK UDALL
    Armed Services, Energy and Natural Resources, Intelligence and Aging Committees

    November 30, 2012

    Udall Rejects Calls from GOP Lawmakers to Sell Off Public Lands to Raise Revenues

    Colorado’s Public Lands Create Jobs, Drive Economic Growth

    Mark Udall said it would be imprudent and detrimental to the Western economy if the federal government were to sell off public lands as part of a deal to avert the fiscal cliff.  Reps. Rob Bishop (R-Utah) and Stevan Pearce (R-N.M.) floated this idea in a letter this week to Speaker of the House John Boehner (R-Ohio).

    “Colorado is home to some of the best open spaces in the West.  In fact, many Colorado businesses and families have moved here because of our high quality of life and spectacular public lands,” Udall said.  “Selling off our parks, forests, wilderness and other public lands – in Colorado and throughout the West – would not only be shortsighted, but it also would undermine a critical component of our thriving outdoor economy.  Our public lands are, in many ways, our most renewable and reliable economic driver.”

    According to a new report from Headwaters Economics, a Montana-based think tank, Colorado’s public lands give private companies located in the state a competitive advantage in attracting top talent, growing and creating jobs.  And according to a June report from the think tank, Colorado’s economy created 228,893 new jobs between 2000 and 2010.  Much of this growth is due to Colorado’s high quality of life and public lands.

    “We need to leave every option on the table when it comes to confronting the fiscal cliff, but we also cannot abandon the strategic investments and job-creating resources we already have in place,” Udall added.

    Udall, who serves on the Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee and chairs the Subcommittee on National Parks, has been a vocal advocate for Colorado’s public lands and the jobs they create.  He also has been a strong opponent to the sale of public lands as part of any budget deal.

    Please contact Mike Saccone at 202-224-4334.

  • 4ec4419398acd.preview 300

    By Matthew van Buren, Taos News

    Posted on April 12, 2012

    Residents and officials from around Taos County gathered Tuesday (April 10) to celebrate a proposal that would give full-fledged wilderness protection to the Columbine-Hondo Wilderness Study Area while also creating new cycling opportunities nearby.

    The Columbine-Hondo, which sits between the Latir and Wheeler Peak wildernesses and includes Lobo Peak, Gold Hill and Flag Mountain, gained “wilderness study area” status three decades ago.

    The Columbine-Hondo Wilderness Coalition has been advocating for full wilderness status for the area in recent years, while the Taos Cycling Coalition has requested bicycle access to some trails in the area. Bicycles and other modes of “mechanical transport” are prohibited in wilderness areas.

    U.S. Sen. Jeff Bingaman, D-NM, visited Taos, Tuesday in part to announce his intention to introduce legislation this week that would permanently protect the 46,000-acre Columbine-Hondo area as wilderness. A ceremony held on Taos Pueblo land just outside Arroyo Seco attracted officials from the Pueblo, Taos County, the Forest Service, land grants, acequia associations and local municipalities and nonprofits.

    “We’re anxious to move ahead and introduce the bill,” Bingaman told the crowd. “It’s a great thing for Northern New Mexico to see this happen.”

    He said he hopes the proposal will become law before he retires at the end of this year, though he said in light of the current divisions in Congress there are no guarantees.

    “That’s a big order,” he said.

    Bingaman said by its merits the legislation “clearly should” be approved, and that he and other members of New Mexico’s Congressional Delegation intend to “make every effort” to get the law passed.

    In a letter supporting the announcement, the Columbine-Hondo Wilderness Coalition points to the importance of the area as a watershed, wildlife habitat and a prime spot for recreation such as trout fishing, as well as referring to its local cultural significance.

    “Community support for safeguarding the Columbine-Hondo is broad and deep,” Peggy Nelson, vice president of the Taos nonprofit Amigos Bravos and a Wilderness Coalition member, is quoted as saying in the release. “Business owners, ranchers, sportsmen, acequia parciantes, mountain bikers, elected officials, conservationists and others have worked together for years to raise awareness about the need to preserve this natural treasure. Water is very precious in this desert state, so protecting the Columbine-Hondo watershed is vital not just for Taos County but for all of New Mexico.”

    Local wilderness guide and llama-trekking outfitter Stuart Wilde has been an outspoken advocate for wilderness protection.

    “Not only will this legislation permanently protect the entire Columbine-Hondo Wilderness Study Area, but it also adds about 1,000 acres to the Wheeler Peak Wilderness, including Middle Fork Lake,” he said. “In addition, there are some minor boundary adjustments to the Wheeler Peak Wilderness, which will create a world-class, high-altitude mountain bike ride for cyclists. It’s a win-win for everyone.”

    Members of the Taos Cycling Coalition, who had initially hoped to gain access to about 19 percent of the Columbine-Hondo, including parts of the Bull-of-the-Woods, Long Canyon, Gold Hill and Goose Creek trails, attended Tuesday’s celebration and spoke in support of the new miles of trail that would be added under the proposal.

    Sean Cassily estimated that 20 new miles of trail would be added, allowing cyclists to ride from Taos Ski Valley to Red River and creating an East Fork to Lost Lake loop. He said the elevation of Lost Lake, about 11,500 feet, is close to that of Long Canyon, but the trail is less steep and would therefore appeal to more cyclists as well as being “a whole lot more sustainable.”

    He said the addition of the new trails would give visiting cyclists, who often ride the South Boundary Trail and don’t know where else to go, an incentive to stay in the Taos area longer.

    “Everybody’s backing this,” he said, saying regional bicycling societies and the International Mountain Bicycling Association are behind the legislation.

    Taos Cyclery owner Doug Pickett said he is pleased with it, as well, as it ultimately protects the Columbine-Hondo while giving unexpected and “unprecedented” access to cyclists. He said he hopes the local mountain biking community as a whole is supportive.

    “It’s going to be some pretty challenging terrain,” he said. “I’m excited about it. I think it would be a big attraction.”

    Bingaman and other members of the New Mexico Congressional Delegation are also working to create the Río Grande del Norte National Conservation Area in Taos and Río Arriba counties this year. It would include a 236,000-acre conservation area and two smaller wildernesses while protecting traditional uses of the land.

    For more information about the Columbine-Hondo Wilderness Coalition, visit www.columbinehondo.org. For more about the Taos Cycling Coalition, visit www.taoscyclingcoalition.org.

  • I’m glad to let our membership and online audience know that we just completed a successful NM Wild board of directors meeting in Las Cruces. This followed by just a few days the announcement of the broad campaign for the Organ Mountains-Desert Peaks National Monument, and we had the opportunity to meet with a number of the leaders of the impressive coalition that is supporting this initiative. In addition, several of us were able to get out into the Uvas Range and see much of the landscape included in the proposal.

    At the meeting we thanked three outstanding persons for their service on NM Wild’s board: Esther Garcia, Jim Hickerson and Brooke Williams are rotating off the board, but we expect all will continue to be active members and supporters. We welcomed to the board two new members, who were elected by the membership: Michael Berman and Dave Foreman. Also, the board extended the otherwise expiring terms of Rick Aster and Tripp Killin. We welcome Michael and Dave, who are old friends of the organization, and are very glad that Rick and Tripp have agreed to continue on the board.

    We are very pleased that many of you are connecting with this website. This year’s board election was conducted electronically, and I am told we had more votes than ever. We just completed our first online auction, with a very satisfactory response, and more and more of you are using the NM Wild website to send us your very welcome contributions.

    Let me refer you to the Organ Mountains-Desert Peaks companion website. This has just been put online and includes great detail about the Organ Mountains-Desert Peaks National Monument campaign. Please take a look. You will see why this is such an exciting and necessary campaign.

    Thanks again for all your support.

    Ken Cole
    Chairperson, NM Wild

  • URGENT ALERT: CALL SENATORS UDALL AND BINGAMAN NOW

     

    Keep the Pressure On

    Fish and Wildlife Plans to Kill a Female Mexican Wolf Today 

    Phone Calls Needed Now to Save Fox Mountain
    Alpha Female with Pups!

     

    wolf and pups EWC

    The US Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) plans to shoot the Alpha Female of the Fox Mountain Mexican gray wolf pack from the air today for livestock depredations. At last official count, there were only 58 Mexican gray wolves in the wild, making them the most endangered mammal in north America, and the most endangered wolf in the world. Every single wild Mexican wolf is important to the wild population.

    Please call now.

    If they kill this wolf, the USFWS will be depriving four pups born this summer of their mother, harming this family of wolves, and destroying one of only a few breeding pairs in the wild.

    Call Senators Tom Udall and Jeff Bingaman now and tell them to keep the Fox Mountain alpha female in the wild with her pups!

    Senator Tom Udall: 505-346-6791
    Senator Jeff Bingaman: 505-346-6601 

    If you live in any of these swing states, please call the local Obama campaign office:
    Colorado, Florida, Iowa, Michigan, Nevada, New Hampshire, Ohio, Virginia, or Wisconsin.

    You can find the nearest Obama campaign office here. http://www.barackobama.com/offices/

    Your own words are best, but here’s a simple script for your call:

    My name is ____________ and I live in ______________ state.

    I support the Mexican wolf recovery effort and I am calling to ask you to stop the killing of the Fox Mountain alpha female.

    With only 50-60 Mexican wolves in the wild, every one is important, and this Mexican wolf has pups born just this summer.

    There are many solutions to conflicts between livestock and wolves, but there are very few Mexican gray wolves.

    The Fish and Wildlife Service needs to release more Mexican wolves into the wild, not kill the ones already there.

    Include any personal reasons you have for caring about this and thank them.

    Please send a message to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. to let them us you have called.

    Thank you for your work to save this Mexican wolf’s life!

    Photo courtesy of Endangered Wolf Center

  • URGENT ALERT: CALL SENATORS UDALL AND BINGAMAN NOW

     

    Keep the Pressure On

    Fish and Wildlife Plans to Kill a Female Mexican Wolf Today 

    Phone Calls Needed Now to Save Fox Mountain
    Alpha Female with Pups!

     

    wolf and pups EWC

    The US Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) plans to shoot the Alpha Female of the Fox Mountain Mexican gray wolf pack from the air today for livestock depredations. At last official count, there were only 58 Mexican gray wolves in the wild, making them the most endangered mammal in north America, and the most endangered wolf in the world. Every single wild Mexican wolf is important to the wild population.

    Please call now.

    If they kill this wolf, the USFWS will be depriving four pups born this summer of their mother, harming this family of wolves, and destroying one of only a few breeding pairs in the wild.

    Call Senators Tom Udall and Jeff Bingaman now and tell them to keep the Fox Mountain alpha female in the wild with her pups!

    Senator Tom Udall: 505-346-6791
    Senator Jeff Bingaman: 505-346-6601 

    If you live in any of these swing states, please call the local Obama campaign office:
    Colorado, Florida, Iowa, Michigan, Nevada, New Hampshire, Ohio, Virginia, or Wisconsin.

    You can find the nearest Obama campaign office here. http://www.barackobama.com/offices/

    Your own words are best, but here’s a simple script for your call:

    My name is ____________ and I live in ______________ state.

    I support the Mexican wolf recovery effort and I am calling to ask you to stop the killing of the Fox Mountain alpha female.

    With only 50-60 Mexican wolves in the wild, every one is important, and this Mexican wolf has pups born just this summer.

    There are many solutions to conflicts between livestock and wolves, but there are very few Mexican gray wolves.

    The Fish and Wildlife Service needs to release more Mexican wolves into the wild, not kill the ones already there.

    Include any personal reasons you have for caring about this and thank them.

    Please send a message to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. to let them us you have called.

    Thank you for your work to save this Mexican wolf’s life!

    Photo courtesy of Endangered Wolf Center

  • By April Reese, E&E reporter
    April 30, 2012

    If he can do it for California’s Fort Ord, he can do it for New Mexico’s Organ Mountains, say leaders of a new effort to persuade President Obama to create a national monument in the area.

    Earlier this month, the president used his executive powers under the Antiquities Act to protect 14,000 acres of a scenic military post in Monterey County, Calif., as the nation’s newest national monument (Greenwire, April 20). Now, veterans groups that were instrumental in the designation are hoping they can parlay that success into a monument proclamation for another area with military significance — as well as numerous archaeological and geologic attributes — in southern New Mexico.

    “We thought if we can do this behind Fort Ord, we can do it elsewhere,” said Mark Starr, program director for the Vet Voice Foundation, an advocacy group comprised of like-minded veterans. Its other causes include protection of Colorado’s Browns Canyon and federal legislation to halt gun sales to terrorist suspects.

    A bill floated by New Mexico’s two Democratic senators, Jeff Bingaman and Tom Udall, and a separate, more geographically limited measure from Rep. Steve Pearce (R-N.M.) to create the Organ Mountains-Desert Peaks National Monument have yet to gain traction, and supporters of the monument proposal are now taking their case to the White House, where they hope to have better luck.

    “The legislation introduced by Bingaman and Udall is a great piece of legislation, but unfortunately, in Congress, there’s not a lot of movement with regard to public land bills,” Starr said. “So if there’s something Obama could do to speed along the process, that would be ideal.”

    The group, which launched its campaign for Obama to protect the New Mexico lands last month, is running ads in various publications this week thanking the president for designating Ford Ord National Monument and urging him to do the same for the Dona Ana County lands. They aim to replicate their successful efforts, which included, among other things, meeting with the president to discuss the proposal.

    The area, located north of the U.S.-Mexico border, encompasses twisting canyons that shelter petroglyphs from three American Indian cultures; historic wagon tracks along the Butterfield Stage route; “Outlaw Rock,” where Billy the Kid once hid from his pursuers; Geronimo’s Cave; bomb testing grounds from World War II; and 243 known archaeological sites, according to a report released this year outlining the area’s historic and archaeological features.

    Its natural features include rare Chihuahuan grasslands, old lava flows and cinder cone mountains. Rocks that were once a practice ground for the Apollo astronauts provide habitat for three species of quail, mountain lion, desert mule deer, javelina and the endangered Aplomado falcon. Eight wilderness study areas lie within the boundaries of the proposed monument.

    “The area is one of the most beautiful and scenic areas in the Southwest. It really is,” Starr said. “There’s a lot of rich military history in the area, too. During WWII, it was a bombing target. Some of the soldiers who trained on those lands didn’t come home.”

    The New Mexico proposal has broad local support, which historically has greatly helped a proposal’s chances of making it onto the president’s desk. The Las Cruces Chamber of Commerce backs a monument designation, and earlier this month, the Mesilla board of trustees unanimously adopted a resolution to support the initiative. The city of Las Cruces and Dona Ana County are expected to follow suit soon.
    The initiative has also garnered support from local religious groups, area businesses, the New Mexico Wilderness Alliance and other groups.

    All of that buoys Starr’s hopes that Obama will see the Organ Mountains-Desert Peaks area as just as deserving of monument status as Fort Ord. If he does protect the New Mexico lands, it will be the third monument designation for the president thus far.

    “We’re very optimistic,” Starr said. “That’s about all I can say. We’re just really hopeful that our efforts, along with those of other key community groups, will make a difference in this effort.”

    The White House did not respond to requests for comment.

    Reese writes from Santa Fe, N.M.

  • By April Reese, E&E reporter
    April 30, 2012

    If he can do it for California’s Fort Ord, he can do it for New Mexico’s Organ Mountains, say leaders of a new effort to persuade President Obama to create a national monument in the area.

    Earlier this month, the president used his executive powers under the Antiquities Act to protect 14,000 acres of a scenic military post in Monterey County, Calif., as the nation’s newest national monument (Greenwire, April 20). Now, veterans groups that were instrumental in the designation are hoping they can parlay that success into a monument proclamation for another area with military significance — as well as numerous archaeological and geologic attributes — in southern New Mexico.

    “We thought if we can do this behind Fort Ord, we can do it elsewhere,” said Mark Starr, program director for the Vet Voice Foundation, an advocacy group comprised of like-minded veterans. Its other causes include protection of Colorado’s Browns Canyon and federal legislation to halt gun sales to terrorist suspects.

    A bill floated by New Mexico’s two Democratic senators, Jeff Bingaman and Tom Udall, and a separate, more geographically limited measure from Rep. Steve Pearce (R-N.M.) to create the Organ Mountains-Desert Peaks National Monument have yet to gain traction, and supporters of the monument proposal are now taking their case to the White House, where they hope to have better luck.

    “The legislation introduced by Bingaman and Udall is a great piece of legislation, but unfortunately, in Congress, there’s not a lot of movement with regard to public land bills,” Starr said. “So if there’s something Obama could do to speed along the process, that would be ideal.”

    The group, which launched its campaign for Obama to protect the New Mexico lands last month, is running ads in various publications this week thanking the president for designating Ford Ord National Monument and urging him to do the same for the Dona Ana County lands. They aim to replicate their successful efforts, which included, among other things, meeting with the president to discuss the proposal.

    The area, located north of the U.S.-Mexico border, encompasses twisting canyons that shelter petroglyphs from three American Indian cultures; historic wagon tracks along the Butterfield Stage route; “Outlaw Rock,” where Billy the Kid once hid from his pursuers; Geronimo’s Cave; bomb testing grounds from World War II; and 243 known archaeological sites, according to a report released this year outlining the area’s historic and archaeological features.

    Its natural features include rare Chihuahuan grasslands, old lava flows and cinder cone mountains. Rocks that were once a practice ground for the Apollo astronauts provide habitat for three species of quail, mountain lion, desert mule deer, javelina and the endangered Aplomado falcon. Eight wilderness study areas lie within the boundaries of the proposed monument.

    “The area is one of the most beautiful and scenic areas in the Southwest. It really is,” Starr said. “There’s a lot of rich military history in the area, too. During WWII, it was a bombing target. Some of the soldiers who trained on those lands didn’t come home.”

    The New Mexico proposal has broad local support, which historically has greatly helped a proposal’s chances of making it onto the president’s desk. The Las Cruces Chamber of Commerce backs a monument designation, and earlier this month, the Mesilla board of trustees unanimously adopted a resolution to support the initiative. The city of Las Cruces and Dona Ana County are expected to follow suit soon.
    The initiative has also garnered support from local religious groups, area businesses, the New Mexico Wilderness Alliance and other groups.

    All of that buoys Starr’s hopes that Obama will see the Organ Mountains-Desert Peaks area as just as deserving of monument status as Fort Ord. If he does protect the New Mexico lands, it will be the third monument designation for the president thus far.

    “We’re very optimistic,” Starr said. “That’s about all I can say. We’re just really hopeful that our efforts, along with those of other key community groups, will make a difference in this effort.”

    The White House did not respond to requests for comment.

    Reese writes from Santa Fe, N.M.

  • Trees Communicate

    Researchers at the University of British Columbia are concluding that trees are interacting with one another in a symbiotic relationship that helps the trees to survive.  Connected by fungi, the underground root systems of plants and trees are transferring carbon and nitrogen back and forth between each other in a network of subtle communication.  Similar to the network of neurons and axons in the human brain, the network of fungi, roots, soil and micro-organisms beneath the larger ‘mother trees’ gives the forest its own consciousness.

    “Some of the forest practices that we have done pay no attention to the role of these ‘mother trees’ or that trees actually will move some of their legacy to the new generation. We didn’t pay attention to it.  Instead what we did is we went and cut down those trees after they died so that we could make 2 x 4′s out of them. And we didn’t give them a chance to give back to the community, I don’t think. So what those dying trees will do is that they will also move resources into living trees, to the young ones coming up, before they go, before they completely collapse. So it’s a transfer, like a passing of the wand from one generation to the next, if we allow it to happen.”

    – Forester Suzanne Simard, a professor at the University of British Columbia

    http://www.wakingtimes.com/2012/05/02/how-trees-communicate-video/

  • USSELL CONTRERAS / Associated Press
    Posted: 10/11/2012

    ALBUQUERQUE – A female Mexican gray wolf wanted for killing too many cows in southwestern New Mexico was captured Wednesday following an extensive search, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service announced.

    The agency said that federal trappers finally caught the elusive pack leader and mother of pups and was listed and found to be in good condition.

    In a statement, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service regional spokesman Tom Buckley said the wolf will be transported to a holding facility for observation then will be handed over to the Southwest Wildlife Conservation Center.

    Trappers with the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Wildlife Services had been combing the northwestern portion of the Gila National Forest for any signs of the wolf for weeks. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service initially issued an order in early August to shoot the alpha female of the Fox Mountain Pack.

    A few days after issuing the lethal order, the agency rescinded it, calling instead for the animal to be trapped and removed from the wild.

    The Southwest Wildlife Conservation Center offered to take the wolf into captivity. The center is a participating member of the Mexican Wolf Species Survival Plan and currently houses other wolves for the program.

    Four cattle deaths linked to the pack happened outside the wolf recovery boundaries within four months, with the most recent one being reported Aug. 1.

    Michael Robinson of the Center for Biological Diversity, an environmental group that has
    Advertisement
    been critical of wolf management, said he was disappointed with the removal. “There’s nothing that shows that there is an escalation of” wolves killing cattle in the area, he said. “A return to punitive wolf removal is damaging.”

    A subspecies of the gray wolf, the Mexican wolf was added to the endangered species list in 1976. A captive-breeding program was started and the first batch of wolves was released into the wild in 1998.

    Efforts to re-establish the predators in the Southwest have stumbled due to legal battles, illegal shootings and other problems. A survey done at the beginning of the year showed there were at least such 58 wolves in the wild along the New Mexico-Arizona border.

  • USSELL CONTRERAS / Associated Press
    Posted: 10/11/2012

    ALBUQUERQUE – A female Mexican gray wolf wanted for killing too many cows in southwestern New Mexico was captured Wednesday following an extensive search, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service announced.

    The agency said that federal trappers finally caught the elusive pack leader and mother of pups and was listed and found to be in good condition.

    In a statement, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service regional spokesman Tom Buckley said the wolf will be transported to a holding facility for observation then will be handed over to the Southwest Wildlife Conservation Center.

    Trappers with the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Wildlife Services had been combing the northwestern portion of the Gila National Forest for any signs of the wolf for weeks. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service initially issued an order in early August to shoot the alpha female of the Fox Mountain Pack.

    A few days after issuing the lethal order, the agency rescinded it, calling instead for the animal to be trapped and removed from the wild.

    The Southwest Wildlife Conservation Center offered to take the wolf into captivity. The center is a participating member of the Mexican Wolf Species Survival Plan and currently houses other wolves for the program.

    Four cattle deaths linked to the pack happened outside the wolf recovery boundaries within four months, with the most recent one being reported Aug. 1.

    Michael Robinson of the Center for Biological Diversity, an environmental group that has
    Advertisement
    been critical of wolf management, said he was disappointed with the removal. “There’s nothing that shows that there is an escalation of” wolves killing cattle in the area, he said. “A return to punitive wolf removal is damaging.”

    A subspecies of the gray wolf, the Mexican wolf was added to the endangered species list in 1976. A captive-breeding program was started and the first batch of wolves was released into the wild in 1998.

    Efforts to re-establish the predators in the Southwest have stumbled due to legal battles, illegal shootings and other problems. A survey done at the beginning of the year showed there were at least such 58 wolves in the wild along the New Mexico-Arizona border.

  • what makes

  • wild harmonies

  • wild harmonies

  • With only 57 Mexican gray wolves known to survive in the wild, the New Mexico Wilderness Alliance (NM Wild) and the Wolf Conservation Center (WCC) are working together toward the mutual goal of restoring harmony to the ecosystems that the Mexican gray wolf traditionally called home.

    Internationally-renowned pianist and wolf advocate Hélène Grimaud made a special visit to Santa Fe in October 2012 to perform a solo concert, “Wild Harmonies,” to promote wolf conservation, elevate awareness for protecting Mexican wolves and their habitat in the Southwest, and raise funds for the WCC (founded by Grimaud) and NM Wild.

    In honor of Grimaud’s solo performance, NM Wild hosted a student art competition to help raise awareness about the endangered Mexican wolf with youth in New Mexico.

    NM Wild invited students across the state to create their best art, music or writing inspired by wild Mexican wolves in wilderness. The two first-place winners, high school students Dale Harper and Katie Lucero, earned four tickets each to the performance, a hotel stay, and meal voucher for their family (up to four) in Santa Fe for the Wild Harmonies event.

    Dale Harper, Rio Rancho Cyber Academy (Rio Rancho)
    Art Piece Title: Defining Melodies

    Dale Harper 640x469

    Katie Lucero, Bosque School (Albuquerque)
    “People in both rural and urban areas have to work together to help keep the wolves protected. The drawing shows a wolf looking into a river and seeing its reflection in a city. Also notice the sun setting and rising!”

    Katie Lucero 640x465

  • With only 57 Mexican gray wolves known to survive in the wild, the New Mexico Wilderness Alliance (NM Wild) and the Wolf Conservation Center (WCC) are working together toward the mutual goal of restoring harmony to the ecosystems that the Mexican gray wolf traditionally called home.

    Internationally-renowned pianist and wolf advocate Hélène Grimaud made a special visit to Santa Fe in October 2012 to perform a solo concert, “Wild Harmonies,” to promote wolf conservation, elevate awareness for protecting Mexican wolves and their habitat in the Southwest, and raise funds for the WCC (founded by Grimaud) and NM Wild.

    In honor of Grimaud’s solo performance, NM Wild hosted a student art competition to help raise awareness about the endangered Mexican wolf with youth in New Mexico.

    NM Wild invited students across the state to create their best art, music or writing inspired by wild Mexican wolves in wilderness. The two first-place winners, high school students Dale Harper and Katie Lucero, earned four tickets each to the performance, a hotel stay, and meal voucher for their family (up to four) in Santa Fe for the Wild Harmonies event.

    Dale Harper, Rio Rancho Cyber Academy (Rio Rancho)
    Art Piece Title: Defining Melodies

    Dale Harper 640x469

    Katie Lucero, Bosque School (Albuquerque)
    “People in both rural and urban areas have to work together to help keep the wolves protected. The drawing shows a wolf looking into a river and seeing its reflection in a city. Also notice the sun setting and rising!”

    Katie Lucero 640x465

  • Unknown

    With only 57 Mexican gray wolves known to survive in the wild, the New Mexico Wilderness Alliance (NM Wild) and Wolf Conservation Center (WCC) are working together towards the mutual goal of restoring harmony to the ecosystems that the Mexican gray wolf traditionally called home.

    The internationally-renowned pianist and wolf advocate Hélène Grimaud is making a special visit to Santa Fe, NM, to perform a solo concert—Wild Harmonies— to promote wolf conservation, elevate awareness for protecting Mexican wolves and their habitat in the Southwest, and to raise funds for the WCC (founded by Ms. Grimaud) and NM Wild.

    Watch an inspirational interview of the renowned musician Hélène Grimaud.

    In addition to Ms. Grimaud’s solo performance, NM Wild is hosting a student art/music/writing competition to help raise awareness about the endangered Mexican wolf with youth in New Mexico. The contest invites students to create their best art, music or writing inspired by wild Mexican wolves in wilderness.

    The winners will be recognized at the Wild Harmonies event at the Lensic Performing Arts Center in Santa Fe on October 23, 2012. First place winners in each category will receive four tickets to the performance, a hotel stay, and meal voucher for their family (up to four) in Santa Fe on October 23. First, second and third place winners in each category will also be recognized in the NM Wild newsletter and the 2013 Wild Guide.

    Categories

    Art: All art must be 11″ x 14″ or smaller. Artwork can be 2-D or 3-D and include drawings, paintings, pastels, sculpture or multimedia. Photography will not be accepted.

    Music: Musical compositions should be less than 3 minutes in length. Music should be recorded on a CD or video for submission.

    Writing: Essays, poetry and short stories are limited to 700 words. Writings should be typed.

    Contest Rules

    1. Submitted artwork, music and writing must by your original work.

    2. Contest is for students currently in middle school or high school

    3. Please include the following: name, address, phone, e-mail, age and school name with your submission.

    4. Only one submission per person.

    5. All entries are to be submitted no later than 11:59 p.m. Mountain Standard Time, September 21, 2012. E-mail entries must be received by September 21. Mail entries must be POSTMARKED by September 21, 2012.

    6. Winners will be notified October 1, 2012.

    Suggestions

    1. Artwork should be inspired by Mexican wolf conservation and protection of their habitat in the Southwest.

    2. No religious content.

    3. Be original and creative!

    Please spread the word!

    To make this contest successful we need your help spreading the word! If you are a teacher, please inform your fellow teachers. This contest makes for a great class project. If you are a student, please deliver this flyer to your teachers.

    All submissions should be sent via e-mail to: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

    or mailed to:

    NM Wild, Wild Harmonies Art Contest

    PO Box 25464 Albuquerque, NM 87125

    Please contact Tisha Broska at 505-843-8696 ext. 106 or This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. with any questions.

    DOWNLOAD INFORMATION SHEET

    DOWNLOAD POSTER

  • Unknown

    With only 57 Mexican gray wolves known to survive in the wild, the New Mexico Wilderness Alliance (NM Wild) and Wolf Conservation Center (WCC) are working together towards the mutual goal of restoring harmony to the ecosystems that the Mexican gray wolf traditionally called home.

    The internationally-renowned pianist and wolf advocate Hélène Grimaud is making a special visit to Santa Fe, NM, to perform a solo concert—Wild Harmonies— to promote wolf conservation, elevate awareness for protecting Mexican wolves and their habitat in the Southwest, and to raise funds for the WCC (founded by Ms. Grimaud) and NM Wild.

    Watch an inspirational interview of the renowned musician Hélène Grimaud.

    In addition to Ms. Grimaud’s solo performance, NM Wild is hosting a student art/music/writing competition to help raise awareness about the endangered Mexican wolf with youth in New Mexico. The contest invites students to create their best art, music or writing inspired by wild Mexican wolves in wilderness.

    The winners will be recognized at the Wild Harmonies event at the Lensic Performing Arts Center in Santa Fe on October 23, 2012. First place winners in each category will receive four tickets to the performance, a hotel stay, and meal voucher for their family (up to four) in Santa Fe on October 23. First, second and third place winners in each category will also be recognized in the NM Wild newsletter and the 2013 Wild Guide.

    Categories

    Art: All art must be 11″ x 14″ or smaller. Artwork can be 2-D or 3-D and include drawings, paintings, pastels, sculpture or multimedia. Photography will not be accepted.

    Music: Musical compositions should be less than 3 minutes in length. Music should be recorded on a CD or video for submission.

    Writing: Essays, poetry and short stories are limited to 700 words. Writings should be typed.

    Contest Rules

    1. Submitted artwork, music and writing must by your original work.

    2. Contest is for students currently in middle school or high school

    3. Please include the following: name, address, phone, e-mail, age and school name with your submission.

    4. Only one submission per person.

    5. All entries are to be submitted no later than 11:59 p.m. Mountain Standard Time, September 21, 2012. E-mail entries must be received by September 21. Mail entries must be POSTMARKED by September 21, 2012.

    6. Winners will be notified October 1, 2012.

    Suggestions

    1. Artwork should be inspired by Mexican wolf conservation and protection of their habitat in the Southwest.

    2. No religious content.

    3. Be original and creative!

    Please spread the word!

    To make this contest successful we need your help spreading the word! If you are a teacher, please inform your fellow teachers. This contest makes for a great class project. If you are a student, please deliver this flyer to your teachers.

    All submissions should be sent via e-mail to: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

    or mailed to:

    NM Wild, Wild Harmonies Art Contest

    PO Box 25464 Albuquerque, NM 87125

    Please contact Tisha Broska at 505-843-8696 ext. 106 or This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. with any questions.

    DOWNLOAD INFORMATION SHEET

    DOWNLOAD POSTER

  • The Taos News

    Thursday, June 14, 2012 12:00 am

    Matthew van Buren

    To bring attention to a proposed Northern New Mexico wilderness area, the New Mexico Wilderness Alliance arranged a hike up Ute Mountain, June 2.

    Ute Mountain, a volcanic formation that rises nearly 2,500 feet from the surrounding plateau to just under 10,100 feet, sits just south of the Colorado border and is managed by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).

    Congress is considering a bill that would create the 13,420-acre “Cerro del Yuta Wilderness” as part of the 236,000-acre Río Grande del Norte Conservation Area. If the bill is passed, the 8,000-acre “Río San Antonio Wilderness” would also be created around San Antonio Mountain.

    BLM park ranger Daniel Rael said Ute Mountain is currently roadless, and game trails and trenches formed by forestry skidders when the mountain was being logged in the early- to mid-20th century form the principal hiking paths. He said, were the area designated as wilderness, management would not change significantly. It would, however, protect the area from future development.

    Outfitter, Mora County commissioner and northern director of the New Mexico Wilderness Alliance John Olivas said he has been taking groups up Ute Mountain annually for each of the last three years. He said the trips are taken in an effort to highlight the Río Grande del Norte area in general and the proposed Cerro del Yuta Wilderness in particular.

    “We’re working on showcasing the area,” he said. “Ute Mountain was designated specifically because of its roadless characteristics. There’s no development. There are no roads.”

    Rael, who is studying geology at New Mexico State University, said Ute Mountain was formed about 2.1 million years ago, making it the youngest of the volcanoes on the Taos Plateau. It sits within the San Luís Basin and Río Grande Rift. As the mountain gains in elevation, prairie grassland becomes primarily Ponderosa pine forest.

    Rael said the BLM acquired the property from a local rancher (though a section of it remains privately owned) and uses it only for wildlife purposes.

    “Pronghorn, deer and elk thrive in the area,” he said.

    Rael said elk commonly migrate through the Ute Mountain area, as they often come in from Colorado and go through the Valle Vidal area before heading west to Ute Mountain, the Wild and Scenic Rivers area and San Antonio Mountain.

    “Hunting is, well, more popular than hiking,” he said of recreational use of the area.

    Olivas said over the last three years of trips up Ute Mountain, he hasn’t encountered other groups. However, a visitor log at the top of the mountain shows hikers are active on Ute.

    “We don’t see a lot of active groups,” he said. “Actually, I don’t think we’ve seen any.”

    The group Olivas took up Ute Mountain June 2 did not reach the top, as late-morning thunderstorms moved in while the hikers were still a few hundred feet away from the summit.

    Legislation that would create the National Conservation Area, including the two wilderness areas, was introduced by Sen. Jeff Bingaman, D-NM, and U.S. Rep. Ben Ray Luján, D-NM, at the end of March 2011. According to information from the Library of Congress, the bill has been placed on the Senate legislative calendar, and the House Subcommittee on National Parks, Forests and Public Lands held a hearing regarding the matter March 29.

    Olivas said Congress may approve the legislation by the end of this year, as Bingaman will be retiring at the end of 2012.

    “That’s definitely the hope,” he said.

    Bingaman has also introduced legislation to give full wilderness protection to the 45,000-acre Columbine-Hondo area in Taos County.

    Olivas provided The Taos News with polling data that shows wide support for protection of the Río Grande del Norte area in Taos and Río Arriba counties, based on 400 telephone interviews conducted in April.

    According to the polling report, 83 percent of Taos County residents support the idea, and 12 percent oppose it. In Río Arriba County, 69 percent favor protecting the Río Grande del Norte area, while 26 percent oppose it. Voters in both counties who hunt several times a year favor the proposed Conservation Area 68 percent to 30 percent, and those who fish several times a year favor it 77 percent to 20 percent.

    “By a 70 percent to 22 percent margin, likely voters in Taos and Río Arriba think this would be good for the local economy rather than bad,” the report states.

    For more information about the New Mexico Wilderness Alliance, visit nmwild.org.

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